derivative

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Derivative

A financial contract whose value is based on, or "derived" from, a traditional security (such as a stock or bond), an asset (such as a commodity), or a market index.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Derivative Security

Futures, forwards, options, and other securities except for regular stocks and bonds. The value of nearly all derivatives are based on an underlying asset, whether that is a stock, bond, currency, index, or something else entirely. Derivative securities may be traded on an exchange or over-the-counter. Derivatives are often traded as speculative investments or to reduce the risk of one's other positions. Prominent derivative exchanges include the Chicago Mercantile Exchange and Euronext LIFFE.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

derivative

An asset that derives its value from another asset. For example, a call option on the stock of Coca-Cola is a derivative security that obtains value from the shares of Coca-Cola that can be purchased with the call option. Call options, put options, convertible bonds, futures contracts, and convertible preferred stock are examples of derivatives. A derivative can be either a risky or low-risk investment, depending upon the type of derivative and how it is used. See also underlying asset.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Derivative.

Derivatives are financial products, such as futures contracts, options, and mortgage-backed securities. Most of derivatives' value is based on the value of an underlying security, commodity, or other financial instrument.

For example, the changing value of a crude oil futures contract depends primarily on the upward or downward movement of oil prices.

An equity option's value is determined by the relationship between its strike price and the value of the underlying stock, the time until expiration, and the stock's volatility.

Certain investors, called hedgers, are interested in the underlying instrument. For example, a baking company might buy wheat futures to help estimate the cost of producing its bread in the months to come.

Other investors, called speculators, are concerned with the profit to be made by buying and selling the contract at the most opportune time. Listed derivatives are traded on organized exchanges or markets. Other derivatives are traded over-the-counter (OTC) and in private transactions.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

derivative

a financial instrument such as an OPTION or SWAP whose value is derived from some other financial asset (for example, a STOCK or SHARE) or indices (for example, a price index for a commodity such as cocoa). Derivatives are traded on the FORWARD MARKETS and are used by businesses and dealers to ‘hedge’ against future movements in share, commodity etc. prices and by speculators seeking to secure windfall profits. See LONDON INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL FUTURES EXCHANGE (LIFFE), EUREX.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

derivative

a financial instrument such as an OPTION or SWAP the value of which is derived from some other financial asset (for example, a STOCK or SHARE) or indices (for example, a price index for a commodity such as cocoa). Derivatives are traded on the FUTURES MARKETS and are used by businesses and dealers to ‘hedge’ against future movements in share, commodity, etc., prices and by speculators seeking to secure windfall profits. See LONDON INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL FUTURES EXCHANGE (LIFFE), STOCK EXCHANGE.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Taking into account the definition of the generalized Dirac function [mathematical expression not reproducible], the factor [mathematical expression not reproducible] in the singular component of the second derivative of Green's tensor leads to a transition from an integral to a constant value; that is, the integral operator [mathematical expression not reproducible] becomes a constant tensor:
Figure 3 shows a peak at 275.4 eV, also associated with [p.sub.[pi]] states, that has already been reported by the method of the second derivative [6,7,10].
We have found that for small values of the normalized time offset [epsilon] = 0.05, [epsilon] = 0.1, and [epsilon] = 0.2, the pulses reported in ascending order of performance with respect to error probability are also placed in ascending order of fractional energy [E.sub.s], descending order of the absolute value of the slope [s.sub.k] of the impulse response evaluated at t/T = 1, and ascending order of the second derivative of the impulse response [a.sub.k] evaluated at t/T = 1.
To construct methods with high orders and satisfactory stability properties, methods were introduced where use second derivatives of the solution [16,18, 21,27].
MFCC along with its first and second derivatives were not the only suitable features for the pronunciation training systems.
[D.sup.2][TE.sub.L] - Second derivative of the Transmission Error at Low load
For example scenario 12 is a steady state situation: all first and second derivatives are zeros.
The FCN amplitude and phase variations with their first and second derivatives are presented in Figure 2.
In order to better identify the differences between spectra, they were vector-normalized followed by a second derivative transformation (Figure 3(b)).
If a point belongs to the feature point of ridge/valley, the first order derivative at this point along n(t) equals to 0, meanwhile, the second derivative at this point reaches to the extreme.
Figure 2 illustrates the spectrum without resampling (a) and with two (b) and four (c) instances of resampling digital audio signal's second derivative. The original sampling characteristics of the spectrum are smooth, and the spectrum peak of the resampling audio signal appears more than once.