Scripophily


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Scripophily

Collecting stock and bond certificates for their scarcity, rather than for their value as securities.

Scripophily

The hobby or practice of collecting expired or antique bond and stock certificates. These certificates can be valuable to the study of economic history and often have value themselves as collectibles.

scripophily

The collecting of old securities certificates. Certificates are often valuable as collectors' items apart from any redemption value they may have.

Scripophily.

Scripophily is the practice of collecting antique stocks, bonds, and other securities.

The most valuable documents are usually the most beautiful, or those that have some historical significance because of the role the issuing company played in the economy. Sometimes those with distinctive errors are also especially valuable.

References in periodicals archive ?
Scripophily is the name given to the hobby of collecting old share and bond certificates.
There are different approaches to collecting scripophily. Some collectors go for certificates relating to a particular company or industry.
Because I had been involved as chief financial officer for technology companies, I quickly realized the potential for e-commerce, so I acquired the domain name, Scripophily.com, and set up a Web site to sell certificates in my free time.
Over the years, because of the expertise I have developed in scripophily, CNBC has interviewed me when stock in a company was being discontinued because of merger or scandal.
See Scripophily.com's E*Trade Certificate Vignette.
Details, 01298 73188 or 27493Tuesday n Bonhams will be holding an auction of scripophily, banknotes and coins at its Montpelier Street, Knightsbridge, premises in London, at 10.30amWednesday n The Knowle, Solihull, premises of Bonhams is the venue for an interesting auction of silver and plated wares which contains a good collection of silver vesta cases, snuff boxes, scent bottles, sovereign cases and small silver items, many of them produced by the talented craftsmen working in Birmingham's jewellery quarter during the Victorian and Edwardian eras.