Savings rate

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Savings rate

Personal savings as a percentage of disposable personal income.

Savings Rate

The amount a person or organization places in a savings account or similar vehicle as a percentage of total disposable income. Savings are important for long term financial stability as it gives a person or organization a cushion for bad times. The savings rate may be calculated at microeconomic level for personal finances or may be aggregated at the national level to gauge financial health. A low or negative savings rate usually indicates excessive borrowing, spending, or both. On the other hand, a high savings rate may result in slower economic growth as persons and companies are saving instead of purchasing goods and services. See also: Rainy day fund.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is inadmissible is that this considerable increase in private savings is not at all justified by the new measures aimed at increasing them, all the more since wage increases concern low income individuals with low marginal saving ratios.
Finance minister said that a vibrant Debt Capital Market will not only diversify investment avenues for investors but will also help in improving saving ratios and enable government to raise financing for crucial infrastructure projects.
Van de Ven (2011) uses the FES and selects families with heads aged 25 to show that the saving ratios of those in the lowest income quintile fell steadily during the period of widening income inequality and sharply in the decade before the crisis, see figure 4.
8) The more malign view is that the increase in borrowing to finance house purchases is a leveraged investment and consumption rose faster than income as the saving ratio fell.
This paper is an attempt to deal with various aspects of rural savings, such as the reliability of rural income and expenditure data, consistency of saving ratio over time, relationship between farm size and saving ratios, rationale of saving behaviour, and the issues regarding the mobilisation of rural savings.
There are, however, two major uncertainties: i) the evolution of household saving ratios and ii) the degree of labour-market slack available over the projection period.
It is revealing to contrast economic income with that used by official statisticians when compiling saving ratios.
Cross-country comparison suggests that much of the gap in household saving ratios between Japan and the OECD average may be partly accounted for by the age structure of the population.
Hence, household saving ratios could stop falling in most countries and could increase somewhat in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada where the tightening of monetary policy has been the sharpest.
The results hint that Turks are often concerned with debts rather than low saving ratios, one of the Achilles' Heels of the Turkish economy.
Reduced demand for cash and bond investments - along with lower saving ratios - combine to squeeze rates and yields higher.
With the low domestic saving ratios, Turkey bankrolled its chronic current account deficit with foreign capital inflow, which surged during the years of relative political stability in the country over the last decade.