Salmonella

(redirected from Salmonella heidelberg)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Salmonella

A genus of bacteria known to cause illness in humans and animals, especially after they have eaten infected food. Salmonella infections have been associated with chicken eggs, a fact that in the past has caused marketing and other business problems in the poultry industry in the United States. However, fatal poisonings are extremely rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 200 Salmonella Heidelberg isolates in the study, 47 (23.5%) were ESC resistant.
We assessed the genetic relatedness of the 47 cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella Heidelberg isolates by using the standardized Xbal-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (online Technical Appendix), which identified 2 major PFGE types: XbaI.1968 and XbaI.1973 (PFGE numbers assigned by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Solna, Sweden).
We successfully transferred plasmids carrying extended-spectrum or AmpC [beta]-lactamases from ESC-resistant Salmonella Heidelberg isolates to the recipient E.
A structured questionnaire was developed to collect detailed information on chicken and other exposures noted during initial interviews, and exposures commonly linked to Salmonella Heidelberg, such as eggs.
An outbreak of 134 Salmonella Heidelberg cases in the Pacific Northwest was linked to chicken consumption.
The proportion of Salmonella Heidelberg human isolates uploaded to PulseNet with this PFGE pattern also has been increasing: from 3.5% to 5.7% of all Salmonella Heidelberg uploads per year during 2004-2008, to 3.7% to 13.7% during 2009-2012.
Sources of human Salmonella Heidelberg infection include consumption of poultry or eggs and egg-containing products (6-10).
In Canada, ceftiofur resistance in bacteria from healthy animals or food is mainly reported in chicken Salmonella Heidelberg isolates originating from farm, abattoir, and retail samples and in chicken abattoir and retail generic E.
A mixed foodborne outbreak with Salmonella heidelberg and Campylobacter jejuni in a nursing home.