Salmonella

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Salmonella

A genus of bacteria known to cause illness in humans and animals, especially after they have eaten infected food. Salmonella infections have been associated with chicken eggs, a fact that in the past has caused marketing and other business problems in the poultry industry in the United States. However, fatal poisonings are extremely rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
Estimates of the incidence of resistant Salmonella infections are needed to inform policy decisions.
Although the primary source of salmonella infection in humans is contaminated food, it has been estimated that 3-5 per cent of all cases of salmonellosis in humans are associated with exposure to exotic pets, including iguanas, turtles, sugar gliders and hedgehogs (Woodward, 1997).
The host susceptibility to recurrent salmonella infection is known to be augmented by lowered immunity due to predisposing factor i.
1The incidence of Salmonella infection in Pakistan is 412 per 100 000 person-years, according to the WHO; amongst the highest in the world.
In this study, the response on a Salmonella infection in relation to the genetic background of the host is studied.
However, researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine have discovered that the increased vulnerability to salmonella infections is a side effect of the body's attempts to protect itself from the damaging effects of the malaria infection.
The state is cautioning parents to protect their children from possible salmonella infection caused by handling baby poultry such as chicks and ducklings.
Salmonellosis from turtles, lizards, and other reptiles represents 6% of all salmonella infections in the United States and 11% of infections in people less than 21 years of age (Clin.
Most Salmonella infections stem from the consumption of eggs, chicken, and eggcontaining foods.
Salmonella infections overall were down 8%, although only one of the five most common strains decreased significantly.
Although salmonella infections generally resolve after mild gastroenteritis, they can develop into serious illnesses.