Load

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Load

The sales fee charged to an investor when shares are purchased in a load fund or annuity. See: Back-end load; front-end load; level load.

Load

A sales charge or commission one pays for purchasing a mutual fund. The charge is paid to the person(s) who sold the investor shares in the fund. There are three types of load. A front-end load occurs when the shareholder pays the fee when buying into the fund. A back-end load means that the investor pays when selling his/her shares. Finally, an investor with a level-load fund pays periodically throughout his/her time as a shareholder. Studies have shown that load funds perform neither better nor worse than no-load funds.

load

The sales fee the buyer pays in order to acquire an asset. This fee varies according to the type of asset and the way it is sold. Many mutual funds impose a sales charge. As a result of the load, only a portion of the investor's funds go into the investment itself. Also called front-end load, sales load.

Load.

If you buy a mutual fund through a broker or other financial professional, you pay a sales charge or commission, also called a load.

If the charge is levied when you purchase the shares, it's called a front-end load. If you pay when you sell shares, it's called a back-end load or contingent deferred sales charge. And with a level load, you pay a percentage of your investment amount each year you own the fund.

load

the work which is assigned to a workstation (machine or operative) during a specified period of time. See PRODUCTION-LINE BALANCING.

Load

A load is a sales charge imposed when mutual fund shares are purchased or redeemed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Front-end sales loads, premium tax loads, and administrative charges on VUL and UL do not differ materially.
From the fund family's perspective, the fund would have been sold at NAV--the fund family would not necessarily even have knowledge of what sales load the broker-dealer imposed.
If a registered representative sells mutual fund shares, in amounts close to but less than a breakpoint at which a lower sales load becomes applicable, to a customer known to have available for investment total amounts which exceed the breakpoint, the representative must disclose to the customer prior to the transaction the savings in sales charges obtainable through increasing the amount of the purchase.
They also argued that if mutual funds were permitted to use fund assets for distribution, instead of traditional front-end sales loads, investors would benefit directly because funds could offer better and more attractive investment products.
Contractual plans impose front-end sales loads that can amount to as much as 50o/6 of first-year contributions.
In doing so, the complaint continues, DOL "bans common and long-accepted forms of compensation for financial services and insurance professionals, such as commissions and sales loads (a mutual fund sales charge).
In calling for comments, the Commission identified a number of issues, including: whether it can be demonstrated that additional sales of shares could benefit shareholders, and if so, the nature and extent of such benefit; whether the mutual fund industry's use of sales loads placed mutual fund distributors at a disadvantage vis-a-vis distributors of other investment products; the anticipated competitive effects within the mutual fund industry were the Commission to allow assets to be used to subsidize distribution costs; and whether it would be more desirable for investors to pay distribution expenses by means of periodic charges against assets rather than by a one time sales load levied at the time of sale.
Morningstar defines its Total Return Annualized as a return, net of any management, administrative, 12b-1 fees and other costs taken out of the fund's assets, and doesn't include sales loads or redemption fees.
Morningstar defines its Total Return Annualized as a return, net of any management, administrative or 12b-1 fees and other costs taken out of the fund's assets, and doesn't include sales loads or redemptions fees.
Morningstar defines its Total Return Annualized as a return, net of any management, administrative and 12b-1 fees and other costs taken out of the fund's assets, and doesn't include sales loads or redemption fees.
First, Morningstar defines its Total Return Annualized as a return net of any management, administrative and 12b-1 fees and other costs taken out of the fund's assets, and doesn't include sales loads or redemption fees.
All fees, transaction costs, bond mark-ups, sales loads, internal management fees, etc.