Sale of Goods Act 1979


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Sale of Goods Act 1979

a UK Act which provides protection to the purchaser of a GOOD by laying down certain legal obligations which a supplier must fulfil as part of the CONTRACT OF SALE. These obligations include that the goods supplied correspond with the description of the goods and that goods are of merchantable quality that is, ‘fit for the purpose’ for which they are intended. See CONSUMER PROTECTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dealers are obliged to prepare the car before offering it for sale, including verifying the recorded mileage and have to abide by the full extent of the new Consumer Rights Act 2015 (in relation to vehicles purchased after October 1, 2015) and the Sale of Goods Act 1979 for purchases prior to this date.
They also have to abide by the new Consumer Rights Act 2015 for vehicles purchased after October 1 2015 and the Sale of Goods Act 1979 for any bought before that.
Effectively, the new rules combine the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999, Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977, Sale of Goods Act 1979 and the Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982.
Additionally the company breached the Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended) by selling vehicles that were not as described, of satisfactory quality or fit for purpose and employed terms and conditions that breached the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999 by attempting to exclude liability and restrict consumers legal rights.
DO BE A SAD FART Goods must be of "satisfactory quality, as described, fit for purpose and last a reasonable length of time," says the Sale of Goods Act 1979 or, for services, the Supply of Goods & Services Act 1982.
Secondly, the Sale of Goods Act 1979 rules that goods must be of "satisfactory quality", which they will not be if they are dangerous.
But the Sale of Goods Act 1979 gives consumers legal protection if a product fails and allows them to make a claim to the manufacturer for up to six years after the purchase date.
The Sale of Goods Act 1979 offers consumers a series of legal rights, one of which is that with the sale of goods the item must be of satisfactory quality.
The CGL is based on the New Zealand Consumer Guarantees Act 1993 (NZ) (62) which is in turn based on the Canadian Consumer Protection Act, (63) and the English Sale of Goods Act 1979 (UK) e54.
The NCC is calling for there to be statutory protection for homebuyers, similar to that offered under the Sale of Goods Act 1979, which states that goods must be of satisfactory quality, be fit for purpose and correspond with their description.
But no matter what the manufacturer or the shop's returns policy says, you're also protected by the Sale of Goods Act 1979.
Sale Of Goods Act 1979 says that any goods, including food served, must be as described (so a vegetarian risotto should not be made with meat stock) and of satisfactory quality.