Sale of Goods Act 1979

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Sale of Goods Act 1979

a UK Act which provides protection to the purchaser of a GOOD by laying down certain legal obligations which a supplier must fulfil as part of the CONTRACT OF SALE. These obligations include that the goods supplied correspond with the description of the goods and that goods are of merchantable quality that is, ‘fit for the purpose’ for which they are intended. See CONSUMER PROTECTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, a car bought outside the UK isn't covered by our Sale of Goods Act, but by the consumer protection law of the country in which it was bought.
Auction sites should be included under the jurisdiction of Trading Standards and our Sale of Goods Act, with them being fined or ordered to compensate purchasers if breaches are found.
A CGU spokesman said: "The Sale of Goods Act says that things you buy must be of satisfactory quality.
Justice James Makau certified the application as urgent and directed the case to be heard on June 4.Mr Mosota further said the order has the effect of suspending the contractual relationship between the corporation and the suppliers, therefore curtailing remedies available to them under the Law of Contract and the Sale of Goods Act, including return of nonconforming goods.
For purchases before this date, the law is the Sale of Goods Act 1974.
We the council tax payers are paying for a service that we are not getting (sale of goods act 1979 may apply).
When it replaced the Sale of Goods Act in October last year, the idea was that it made it much clearer for consumers to understand their rights, and for retailers to be able to deal with consumer problems.
Dealers are obliged to prepare the car before offering it for sale, including verifying the recorded mileage and have to abide by the full extent of the new Consumer Rights Act 2015 (in relation to vehicles purchased after October 1, 2015) and the Sale of Goods Act 1979 for purchases prior to this date.
The Sale of Goods Act is about to be replaced by the Consumer Rights Act 2015.
The new Act replaces the Sale of Goods Act and the Supply of Goods and Services Act, which will still apply to purchases made before 1 October.
Your consumer rights are generally the same, so you can, for example, dispute a payment under the Sale of Goods Act. But keep a receipt, as this is the only proof of payment you will have.