cheque

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Check

A document in which the writer orders his/her bank to pay to the receiver of the check a stated amount of money. For example, Joe may write Andrew a check for $10. In doing so, Joe is signing a document stating that he wishes to give Andrew $10, that it is available in Joe's bank, and Andrew can receive it from there. Andrew can either go to Joe's bank, present the check, and collect $10, or he may go to his own bank to deposit the check into his own account. In that case, Andrew's bank contacts Joe's bank and collects the $10 that way. Checks can be for any amount. See also: Check hold.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

cheque

a means of transferring or withdrawing money from a BANK or BUILDING SOCIETY current account. In the former case, the drawer of a cheque creates a written instruction to his bank or building society to transfer funds to some other person's or company's bank or building society account (the ‘payee’). In the latter case, money may be withdrawn in cash by a person or company writing out a cheque payable to themselves. See COMMERCIAL BANK.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

cheque

a means of transferring or withdrawing money from a BANK or BUILDING SOCIETY current account. In the former case, the drawer of a cheque creates a written instruction to his or her bank or building society to transfer funds to some other person's or company's bank or building society account (the ‘payee’). In the latter case, money may be withdrawn in cash by a person or company writing out a cheque payable to themselves. Cheques may be ‘open’, in which case they may be used to draw cash, or ‘crossed’ with two parallel lines, in which case they cannot be presented for cash but must be paid into the account of the payee. See COMMERCIAL BANK.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Wafaa Abd El-Razek a 55 -year- old housewife said "I used to go reserve a calve in one of charity organisation, for Eid Al-Adha holiday five years ago, this cost me around EGP 2,000, the organization distributed one third of the calve on the poor, then I should decide whether if I will take one or two thirds of the calve, but now it becomes more convenient to buy "Sakk Al-Odhya", which means I only buy one third of the calve and donate it for the poor, what cost me EGP 1,950."
According to web-based Islamic finance sites, sukuk (plural of sakk) are asset-backed securities designed to provide a relatively fixed stream of investment income without violating Sharia (Islamic law) and the prohibition of interest.
Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK) and the European Institute of Oncology (EIO).
paise/heina (Sakk) < paise 'Geschwur', estS (Plur.) 'paiso/ haina (Se), 'paiso/leht, -leh't, -lih't (Von V), paiss (Kan) (EMSK; Vilbaste 1993 : 478); weps.
Sukuk comes from the word "sakk" which is considered an investment certificate that follows Islamic financing principles.
Entry [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE EN ASCII] sakk. The correct vocalization is "sukk," cf.
Concepts like agency and trust originated at the feet of scholars in Baghdad and Cordoba, the instruments they created ranging from the Sakk - from which the word cheque is derived - to the Suftaja (letter of credit), the Hawala (money transfer system), and the Mudaraba (investment partnership).
The conservative Noor Party said it supported Al AzharC[bar]s point of view that the possibility of selling the asset to repay the sakk violated sharia law whereas the Muslim Brotherhood saw it as a political stance stemming from the desire for state assets and unrelated to sharia law.