PEST Analysis

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PEST Analysis

In risk assessment, a hermeneutic used for investigating the impact of a venture or investment. The term is an acronym for political, economic, social, and technological, which are the types of issues that must be addressed before one decides whether or not to make an investment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Telefonica also had a raft of exciting IoT solutions on display, including smart sports shoes outfitted with a step analysis tool, intelligent fleet management software and a connected protective helmet for use in extreme environments.
The Alice decision provides guidance about its two step analysis, and as courts have applied that test, the contours of the test have become increasingly demarcated.
(58) The Chevron court coined a two- step analysis in which courts ask
(explaining Gonsalves's two step analysis and meaning of "testimonial in fact").
The step by step analysis helps analyze risk versus cost of choosing the optimal location - one that gives the best level of product safety, for the least disruption, and for the least cost.
The step by step analysis helps analyze risk versus cost of choosing the optimal location--one that gives the best level of product safety, for the least disruption, and for the least cost.
The wider consequences of this decision of the House of Lords may however be limited because there has already (with the exception of this particular case, where insufficiency considerations impermissibly crept into an inventive step analysis), been a discernable shift in approach on the part of the English Patents Court and the Court of Appeal, especially in the pharmaceuticals and medical device areas, which have become increasingly reluctant to hold patents invalid for lack of inventive step.
"If you go through this several step analysis, your company should have the outline of a comprehensive capability sourcing strategy.
Three CAB durability methodologies are currently available: stress or strain results scaled according to appropriate loading histories, body dynamic modal stress and modal response time histories, and transient time step analysis with all inputs coming directly from the finite element results.
The time step analysis shows that with up to 10~30 seconds intervals, the results remain similar.
In this case, the panel concluded that the first step analysis failed to establish a prima facie or bare bones case against the respondents.