SPINs


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SPINs

Stands for Standard & Poor's 500 Index Subordinated Notes.

Spin

To attempt to present a situation in the best possible light. For example, a political operative may attempt to spin a situation in which a candidate who took a bribe by saying it was a gift or donation. The term is somewhat derogatory, but is common in business as well as politics. See also: Jawboning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many pilots get into a spin by stalling while in a slipping or skidding turn.
New research showed how applying an electric field in a common semiconductor material can dramatically increase the efficiency of the spin-Hall effect which is key for generating and detecting spin from an electrical input.
An atomic nucleus consists of both protons and neutrons, and the advantage of using the nuclear spin as a qubit is that the nucleus is well protected, and nearly impervious to unwanted electromagnetic disturbance, which is a condition for keeping the sensitive information in the qubit intact.
In fact, black holes are nature's simplest objects, described only by their mass and spin. So why do so many scientists study these objects, and why does the public gobble up fictional accounts of them?
To keep spins stable, Koralek and his team created a special semiconducting material that coaxes the electrons in such away that the directions of the magnetic fields created by their spins form a helix, which had never been observed before.
The numerical value of the N-coefficient multiplied by sin[[theta].sub.e], [[theta].sub.e] being the electron emission angle with respect to the neutron spin direction, represents the transverse component of the electron polarization which is contained in the plane spanned by the neutron polarization and the electron momentum.
Just spin. Then I started to try and grab it and it was hard to do under the coping, so I just went for it after a little backside air.
Spintronics uses the spin of electrons to store and relay information.
Yes, your airplane was spin-tested during certification, but only to determine it recovered from a one-turn spin in not more than an additional turn or three seconds, whichever takes longer.
Earth's magnetic field causes some of the electrons in the mantle's minerals to become slightly spin-polarized, meaning the directions in which their spins point are no longer completely random, but have some net orientation.
corresponds to neutrons with the spins distributed in a semi-plane with a positive direction of the x-axis.
According to the Cavendish Laboratory, the University of Cambridge's Department of Physics, spintronics, which exploits the electron's tiny magnetic moment, or "spin", could radically change computing due to its potential of high-speed, high-density and low-power consumption.