Rube Goldberg


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Rube Goldberg

A slang term for an unnecessarily complicated solution to a problem, or a problem with a solution that is itself problematic. The term refers to a 20th-century American cartoonist who drew large machines performing simple actions for which a machine is not necessary.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation: Students are evaluated on their teamwork, knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as their Rube Goldberg device and prototype documentation.
A selection of his late-in-life political cartoons traces the remarkable coda of his long career, while his enduring popularity is underscored by such items as the Rube Goldberg U.S.
To get their Rube Goldberg machines working, teams had to make multiple revisions--an essential real-world skill.
The following high schools won grants via the Rube Goldberg Machine Challenge:
Rube Goldberg machine makers link simple devices into elaborate compound machines.
A Rube Goldberg machine is a "contraption, invention, device or apparatus that is deliberately over-engineered to perform a simple task in a complicated fashion, generally including a chain reaction.
Science teacher Jessica Anderson at Powell County High School in Deer Lodge, Montana, uses the @SciencePCHS tag on Instagram, Twitter, and Vine to post class projects like a Rube Goldberg machine.
The $533 million, 58,000-member Zeal Credit Union's sponsored team of science enthusiasts broke the world record for the most dominoes toppled at an event and are awaiting word from the Guinness Book of World Records as to whether they've completed the highest number of steps in a Rube Goldberg machine.
A few years ago, the band OK Go, which had previously been best known for the expertly choreographed treadmill dance video for their song "Here It Goes Again," created another hugely popular video for the track "This Too Shall Pass." The four-minute video focused on a giant Rube Goldberg machine--those unnecessarily complicated contraptions that use all sorts of intricate steps and chain reactions to ultimately pull off a relatively simple task.
Among many other interactive experiences, students tested a For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology (FIRST) Tech Challenge robot at the NAVSUP WSS booth, experienced the concept of reverse engineering when they got their hands scanned by a 3D laser scanner at the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) booth, completed engineering challenges such as knot tying and Rube Goldberg machine-building, and participated in an underwater robotics remotely-operated vehicle competition.
So go ahead and build a Rube Goldberg Machine, disassemble clocks, see how things work.