New Deal

(redirected from Roosevelt's New Deal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

New Deal

a government programme introduced in 1998 aimed at reducing youth UNEMPLOYMENT and long-term unemployment amongst older workers. Persons qualifying for the youth scheme must be aged between 18-24 and have received the JOBSEEKERS ALLOWANCE for at least 6 months. Participants in the scheme are offered support and advice in seeking paid work for 4 months (the ‘Gateway’ period). After this if they are still unemployed they are placed on one of 4 options; (1) subsidized employment (2) work with a voluntary organization(3) work with an environmental task force (each of the options lasts 6 months) or (4) a one year training or education course.

Persons qualifying for the long-term unemployed scheme must be aged 25 or over and have received the jobseekers allowance for at least two years.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

New Deal

a government programme introduced in 1998 aimed at reducing youth UNEMPLOYMENT and long-term unemployment amongst older workers. Persons qualifying for the youth scheme must be aged between 18 and 24 and have received the JOBSEEKERS ALLOWANCE for at least six months. Participants in the scheme are offered support and advice in seeking paid work for four months (the ‘Gateway’ period). After this, if they are still unemployed, they are placed on one of four options:
  1. subsidized employment;
  2. work with a voluntary organization;
  3. work with an environmental task force (each of these options lasts six months); or
  4. a one-year training or education course. Persons qualifying for the long-term unemployed scheme must be aged 25 or over and have received the jobseekers allowance for at least two years. See SUPPLY-SIDE ECONOMICS.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Roosevelt, Democrats were more the small government party and Republicans the big government one; Roosevelt's New Deal and the rise of the broad government programs we have had ever since turned that around.
These new ideals Dickstein sees as related to President Roosevelt's New Deal emerging in 1933, a deal that was not a Keynesian stimulus package for consumerism but 'collective planning and social consensus'.
In the 1930s, the devastating effects of the Great Depression were movingly depicted by Farm Security Administration photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans, publicizing the needed reforms of Roosevelt's New Deal. W.
Roosevelt's New Deal, the Securities Act of 1933 and the Glass-Steagall Act (GSA) were enacted, setting up a pervasive regulatory scheme for the public offering of securities and generally prohibiting commercial banks from underwriting and dealing in those securities.
They describe how construction began in the 1930s with Roosevelt's New Deal, how it was soon halted by politicians and conservationists, how it began again in the 1960s, and how it was never completed.
They showcase the careers of government employees who investigated bootleggers; taught at Indian schools; worked in Japanese-American internment camps, in prisons, and on anti-prostitution boards; and created and implemented initiatives in Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal agencies, among others."
Roosevelt's New Deal could have profited from a greater appreciation of market theory, but it did rightly grasp that the free market, if more efficient than bureaucratic management, is also pitiless and amoral.
Cabinet position, is widely credited as being one of the prime intellects and moving forces behind Roosevelt's New Deal. She was FDR'S "conscience."
One of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal policies offered temporary grain storage in the form of what we called "government granaries." These were pre-manufactured kits, knocked down for shipment and hauled by rail.
Roosevelt's New Deal. From 1935 to 1943, it employed about 8.5 million Americans.
By most historical accounts, Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal programs relating to the nation's infrastructure, social welfare, and artistic production were vital components of the American economy during the Depression-plagued 1930s.