Treaty of Rome

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Treaty of Rome

A 1957 agreement establishing the European Economic Community. Under the Treaty, the EEC shared a parliament and Court of Justice with the European Coal and Steel Community. These organizations eventually merged and formed the basis for what became the European Union.
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Treaty of Rome

an agreement signed in 1958 by the six founding countries of the European Economic Community that established the objectives and principles of the modern EUROPEAN UNION. The Treaty provided for the removal of trade restrictions between member countries, free labour and capital mobility, harmonization of tax policies and assistance to poorer regions.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Of such branches, the Rome Treaty grants comparable judicial power to the European Court of Justice, but diffuses legislative and executive authority among the E.C.'s Commission, Parliament, and two Councils with complexities that baffle U.S.
Kaiser points out that the British government is often accused of having "missed the bus" after the crucial Messina conference of 1955 (which initiated discussions that led to the Rome treaty of 1957).
The Act, which formally came into operation in July 1987, was primarily designed to modify the 1957 Rome Treaty that created the European Economic Community (EEC).
A directive, as spelled out by Article 189 of the Rome Treaty, binds member nations only as to the result to be achieved, leaving "form and method" to each member's judgment.
If it had to be renegotiated, and as the debate progresses, more fundamental features of the Rome Treaty itself are now to be looked at, membership could be made easier.
The plain fact is that the Rome Treaty is weak in that it only acknowledges central governments in the Community Member States and passes the buck to them, obliging them to translate EC legislation into national law.
The European Economic Community was established under the Rome Treaty signed in 1956 by six countries (Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg) and became effective January 1, 1958.
The European Coal and Steel Community was established by a 1951 Paris treaty, and the European Atomic Energy Community was established by another Rome treaty in 1957.
The United States did not ratify the Rome treaty that established the ICCin 2002, with then-President George W.
In effect, the US "unsigned" the Rome Treaty. Bush administration officials later expounded on why the US was renouncing the ICC, citing among others the lack of adequate checks and balances on the prosecutors and judges; the dilution of the US Security Council's authority over international criminal prosecutions, and the lack of any effective mechanism to prevent politicized prosecutions of American military personnel.
The White House statement clarified that President Clinton ordered the signature because the United States seeks to "remain engaged in making the ICC an instrument of impartial and effective justice in the years to come." Statement on the Rome Treaty on the International Criminal Court (Dec.
"But for the people of the Nuba, the realities of such constant attacks--all of them war crimes under the terms of the Rome Treaty that is the statutory basis for the International Criminal Court--are ever-present, destroying their lives and livelihoods," he further said in a short statement extended to Sudan Tribune..