Robert's Rules of Order


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Robert's Rules of Order

Rules for the conduct of meetings in an orderly manner. First used in 1876 by American army officer Henry Martyn Robert, who was asked to preside over a church meeting and discovered that neither he,nor anyone else,knew a proper or consistent way to conduct meetings. Today, almost all organizations, including those for condominiums, co-op apartments,homeowners groups,and others,adopt Robert's Rules of Order in their bylaws. (The official Web site at www.robertsrules.com warns that the earliest editions of the Rules are no longer copyright protected,and so may be found in reprint, masquerading as current editions.)

References in periodicals archive ?
In promulgating the regulations, rules, and order of business, the [c]ity [commission shall be guided by Robert's Rules of Order (as revised)."
Robert's Rules of Order is an established code used in parliamentary proceedings in the US.
Using the "Robert's Rules of Order" system can seem unfair, as people are forced to vote against acceptable choices in order to get to the most favored choice.
"If the person who created the tally sheet says we don't count blanks, isn't that an indication?'' He also noted that Robert's Rules of Order calls for blanks to be considered abstentions, and he questioned whether delegates who affirmatively chose to vote "blank'' could be disenfranchised if their votes were not counted.
One week prior to the convention, all delegates should make a cursory review of Robert's Rules of Order in the summarized version.
* Use breaks to get back on track: A great suggestion in the latest version of "Robert's Rules of Order" by Henry M.
According to Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised, 10th Edition (2000, Perseus Publishing), when you're conducting a board meeting with fewer than a dozen members present
The school board is supposed to follow Robert's Rules of Order which if followed would be a solid foundation in running more efficient meetings.
He said it was a procedure previously used in West Brookfield and he was merely following precedent based on Robert's Rules of Order, the basis for conducting a town meeting.
The most commonly-used procedural guide is a book that has become the standard for the conduct of meetings: Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, (RONR), now in its 10th edition.
This is also called the "dark horse" rule, because of the following statement from Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised (10th edition): "The nominee receiving the lowest number of votes is never removed from the next ballot unless the bylaws so require, or unless he withdraws--which, in the absence of such a bylaw, he is not obligated to do.
May 2 marks 176 years since the birth of Henry Martyn Robert, who wrote Robert's Rules of Order. Mr.