Risk-Loving

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Risk-Loving

Describing an investor who is willing to take big risks to increase the potential return on investments. For example, a risk loving investor would be more likely to invest in the IPO of a company with a new and exciting product about which little is known, than to invest in a secured bond issued by a well known and widely trusted company. Critics maintain that risk loving investors accept lower returns for their risk and, as such, are not investing efficiently. See also: Markowitz efficient portfolio.
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More than 150 people were asked to look at photos of the men before and after their surgery and rate them on personality (aggressiveness, extroversion, likeability, risk-seeking, sociability, trustworthiness), attractiveness and masculinity.
According to the Theory of Prospectus ("The Prospect Theory" in English) developed by the authors, risk preferences are a behavioral mix of risk-seeking and risk aversion.
Younger populations are more risk-seeking, adventurous and entrepreneurial.
This opinion in its inherent approach is faulty at best, extremely risk-seeking, and perilous.
Dr Feiby Nassan, another member of the Harvard team, said: 'An equally plausible interpretation is that our findings could reflect the fact that men with higher testosterone levels are more likely to engage in risk-seeking behaviors, including smoking marijuana.'
Dr Feiby Nassan, another member of the Harvard team, said: "An equally plausible interpretation is that our findings could reflect the fact that men with higher testosterone levels are more likely to engage in risk-seeking behaviours, including smoking marijuana."
The research team used computational modelling to analyse two aspects of the participants financial decision-making: loss aversion, which is a tendency to weight potential losses more strongly than potential gains; risk-aversion asymmetry, which looks at the tendency to be risk-averse for potential gains and risk-seeking for potential losses.
endowment effect, the status quo bias, and risk-seeking choices when
"This heighted feeling of power results in more risk-seeking behavior."
In other words, does being placed at high elevations make people more risk-seeking than they would be, say, at street level?
The drinks also fuel risk-seeking behaviour such as alcohol and drugs abuse, accidents, violence and antisocial behaviour - on top of rotting teeth, according to the study published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health.
A new review of current scientific knowledge on energy drinks found their advertised short-term benefits can be outweighed by serious health risks, which include risk-seeking behaviour, mental health problems, increased blood pressure, obesity and kidney damage.