agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
d) Use of riot control agents in rear echelon areas outside the zone of immediate combat to protect convoys from civil disturbances, terrorists and paramilitary organizations.
As part of the compromise which facilitated ratification, the Senate included an interpretation of the CWC as applied to Riot Control Agents in its advice and consent resolution.
Non-lethal weapons, including riot control agents, may cause death or serious injury among a percentage of the targeted group.
The argument rests in part on the CWC's different definitions of toxic chemicals (causing "death, temporary incapacitation, or permanent harm to humans or animals") versus riot control agents (chemicals that "can produce rapidly in humans sensory irritation or disabling physical effects which disappear within a short time following termination of exposure").
The United States thus asserts that military use of riot control agents is limited by the CWC only by a single sentence: Riot control agents may not be used "as a method of warfare.
Despite its uniquely liberal interpretation of the CWC restrictions on the use of riot control agents, it is hard to imagine that even the United States could consider chemical incapacitants as anything other than toxic chemicals, and thus fully covered by the CWC.