property

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property

see ASSET.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

property

Any tangible or intangible thing that is or may be owned by someone.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
' Act is being introduced to prevent bigamy, polygamy, strengthen widows' rights to property & check instances of child marriage'
The statute pinwales, in pertinent part, that "any person in possession of (or obligated with respect to) property or rights to property subject to levy upon which a levy has been made shall, upon demand of the Secretary, surrender such property or rights (or discharge such obligation) to the Secretary." Employers fall squarely within the category of persons required to comply with a levy: Upon levy, the employer must withhold and remit amounts specified in the IRS tables in Publication 1494 until the outstanding tax liability has been satisfied or the levy is released.
shall be a lien in favor of the United States upon all property and rights to property, whether real or personal, belonging to such person." The broad language of the statute shows Congress meant to reach every property interest a taxpayer has, allowing the government to collect tax debts from the assets of a taxpayer's nominee, instrumentality or alter ego.
THE descendent of an earl was behind bars yesterday after a fallout with her brother and sister over the rights to property from the family mansion.
The court upheld charges that 170,000 Greek Cypriot refugees living in the south of the island and banned from returning to their homes in the north were deprived of rights to property, compensation and a family life.
None of this can be taken as some culmination of a movement toward increased rights for women; during the period from the thirteenth through the eighteenth centuries, women in fact lost rights to property and children that they had enjoyed earlier.
All the good arguments against the criminalization of consensual acts are here, somewhere: how these crusades prop up and empower organized crime; eat away at our constitutional rights to property and freedom from search and seizure; come nowhere close to achieving their aims; corrupt legitimate law enforcement; promote irresponsibility; and in general are merely sops to ignorance, fear, hatred, and envy.