Right-to-Work

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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Repealing the so-called right-to-work law that was passed under Walker.
But other federal circuits have ruled that local governments may enact local right-to-work laws, making the issue ripe for a U.S.
The Wisconsin story is mirrored in other states that passed right-to-work laws in recent years.
We compare the Wisconsin and Michigan membership, revenue, and campaign-contribution trends to those of NEA affiliates in two other groups of states: the 25 states that allowed agency fees during the six-year period, which we call "agency-shop" states (including West Virginia, Missouri, and Kentucky), and the 23 states that had right-to-work laws on the books during this time and therefore did not allow fees, which we call "right-to-work" states.
This is a state that was once was a bulwark of industrial unionism--the United Auto Workers union was founded there--but now has a Right-to-Work law and political climate that is hostile toward unions.
Right-to-work laws allow workers to opt out of paying those dues.
"The Republican states have responded by passing right-to-work laws and the Democratic states have responded by raising the minimum wage."
Now it's up to the states to decide whether right-to-work laws create free riders, or whether fair-share dues violate workers' rights.
What started as a top-down movement funded by moguls like DeMille eventually came to have hundreds of thousands of enthusiastic adherents who lobbied and litigated for right-to-work laws across the United States.
(2013) "Economic Growth and Right-to-Work Laws." Mackinac Center for Public Policy.
Fisk and Sachs propose another possible solution to the inequity of the "right-to-work laws": abandonment of the principle of exclusivity and the duty of fair representation in "right-to-work" states for those who opt out of all fees.