Right-to-Work


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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Under a decades-old political compromise, Federal labor policies promoting compulsory unionism persist side by side with the ability of states to curb such compulsion with right-to-work laws.
Our right-to-work laws are a significant selling point to job creators, especially in contrast to states like Washington.
population living in right-to-work states has been because there has been a huge migration of persons from the nonright-to-work states to those allowing greater personal liberty with respect to employment.
Today there are 22 states with right-to-work laws on the books, mainly in the Deep South and Midwest, and four of them (Arkansas, Arizona, Florida and Oklahoma) include these right-to-work provisions in their state constitutions.
Part II briefly traces the history of right-to-work, some conventional research attesting to its deleterious effects on unions, and how the legal gulf between the right-to-work and non-right-to-work models is less stark than is commonly presumed.
Simply put, right-to-work laws weaken unions and collective bargaining and deny majority rule.
New auto on-time component companies are settling in right-to-work states which are harder to organize than other states.
Frey: A right-to-work (for less) law does not allow union contracts to contain provisions requiring mandatory dues and/or fees to be paid to unions.
Right-to-work legislation in Idaho had long been stymied by politics until 1985, when the legislature overrode Governor John Evans's veto and right-to-work became law.
Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act permits state right-to-work (right-to-work) laws which prohibit compulsory payment of union dues.
Its main contribution is to provide readers with a narrative covering unionism's confrontation with right-to-work forces at both the state and national level, within organized labor and in the various legislatures.
Idaho became the 21st State to enact a "right-to-work' law, but union leaders won a court order temporarily blocking implementation of the law.