Right-to-Work


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The measure Rauner vetoed not only would have made local right-to-work ordinances unlawful, but it could have resulted in jail time for trustees or council members voting for such a move.
But the issue at stake with right-to-work laws is not about whether workers are coerced to join unions - in the United States, no employee can be forced to sign up - but union payments.
Making the satisfactory completion of right-to-work checks a condition of any offers of employment.
Twenty-six states and Guam have passed right-to-work laws that give workers a choice when it comes to union membership--a move that labor leaders charge has zapped the power out of organized labor.
With Scalia gone, the court lacked a majority in favor of the right-to-work concept.
Right-to-work started with a strong foot-hold in the anti-union South, where union opponents also tended to be very hostile to civil rights.
Recent right-to-work campaigns were successful in Michigan and Wisconsin while Catholic episcopal bodies in those states remained silent or issued bland or conflicting statements--a stark turnaround from the clear denunciation of such efforts by the U.
Critique: A critically important and timely study, ""The End of American Labor Unions: The Right-to-Work Movement and the Erosion of Collective Bargaining" is presented in four major chapters: Judges' Rules: Making the common Law of Labor, 1860-1933; From Section 7(a) to the Closed Shops States' Rights in Labor Law; Evolving Lavbor Policy: From World War II into the Obama Administration; A New Direction.
The real impact of right-to-work laws on state economies are lower wages, growing inequality and more struggling families.
At the same time Americans express greater approval than disapproval of unions, they widely support right-to-work laws.
But while unions fear the loss of membership as right-to-work legislation passes, they may be missing the real story: Overall, states with right-to-work laws have gained union members, while other states have lost them.
IN DECEMBER OF LAST YEAR, the American state of Michigan--the birthplace of the UAW and the sit-down strikes of the 1930s that ushered in industrial unionism in North America--became the 24th state to pass a right-to-work law.