property

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property

see ASSET.

property

Any tangible or intangible thing that is or may be owned by someone.

References in periodicals archive ?
The situation is even worse in rural areas because women are denied right to own property.
It had to do with married women having the right to own property - but still, it was a threat to traditional marriage.
1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.
The sense of despair driving some Palestinians to join such groups is what they perceive as a lack of rights and entitlements; these frequently include being denied the right to own property and to work in many specific fields, under the terms of strict laws established to prevent their naturalisation in the various host countries.
Identity is closely tied to human rights: the right to protection, education, employment; the right to own property, migrate or marry; and the right to vote.
The Turkish Parliament passed a law earlier this year that enables Saudi and Gulf citizens the right to own property in Turkey.
A community of 1000 low-income families on the outskirts of Cochabamba city, Bolivia, is currently in a historic struggle to maintain their constitutional right, the right to own property collectively.
The Modern Concept of TBE: The Rule of Construction and Presumption of Intention--By statutory and constitutional enactments, married women gained the right to own property in their individual names.
Keeping a sharp eye on the distinction between history and literature, recoverable fact and imagined narrative, Chakkalakal argues that it is precisely because the slave's marriage takes place outside the law--because the slave, as a legal non-person, has no contractual capacity; no right to own property, make a will, or receive an inheritance; and no right as a husband to control or constrain a wife--that the slave's marriage is free from the deforming influence of Victorian culture's class and gender inequalities as expressed through and protected by law.
The truth is we pay enough tax on property under the current tax regime and there is no justification for paying the state every year for the right to own property.
These forbade public worship outside of churches, restricted the church's right to own property, closed monasteries, deprived clergy of civil rights, forbade the wearing of clerical or religious garb, and banned clergy from criticizing the government or commenting on public affairs in the press.
So, while there may be a constitutional right to own property in the form of livestock, there is no fundamental right to keep a cow wherever we please.