Right-to-Work

(redirected from Right to Work Laws)
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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
GOP lawmakers saw their opportunity and passed the right to work law without hearings in a lame duck session.
It appears that labor-union officials are encouraging their members to write letters to their local newspapers in Wisconsin, in an attempt to argue the case against Right to Work laws.
average of 13 percent) and other such states is not a function of their Right to Work laws, as labor-union supporters would have us believe.
A better way of evaluating whether Right to Work laws help or hurt the poor--and the economy in general--is to compare Right to Work states as a group to non-Right to Work states.
Census Bureau data reveal that, while just 23 of the 50 states have Right to Work laws, more than half of the nation's population resides in those 23 Right to Work states.
For a detailed history of labor's decline and weakness in the right-to-work states, see generally Raymond Hogler, The Historical Misconception of Right to Work Laws in the United States: Senator Robert Wagner, Legal Policy, and the Decline of American Unions, 23 HOFSTRA LAB.
President Harry Truman said: "You will find some people saying that they are for the so-called right to work law, but they also believe in unions.
States should not need to pass right to work laws to protect themselves from bad Federal labor policy.
State right to work laws appear to be a pivotal policy variable.
The number of economic development policies adopted has increased over time in all categories, except for state right to work laws (SRWL).
The influence of right to work laws had a positive sign, but did not have a statistically significant relationship to growth in per capita income.
For example, we talked about some of the underlying reasons that union members--and members of the larger public--might themselves be sympathetic to the attacks on unions embodied in Right to Work laws.