Right-to-Work

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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
GOP lawmakers saw their opportunity and passed the right to work law without hearings in a lame duck session.
It appears that labor-union officials are encouraging their members to write letters to their local newspapers in Wisconsin, in an attempt to argue the case against Right to Work laws. One talking point being emphasized was highlighted in a letter to the editor that was printed in the Appleton Post-Crescent on May 1: "Having a right to work state does not necessarily attract more industry.
average of 13 percent) and other such states is not a function of their Right to Work laws, as labor-union supporters would have us believe.
A better way of evaluating whether Right to Work laws help or hurt the poor--and the economy in general--is to compare Right to Work states as a group to non-Right to Work states.
Census Bureau data reveal that, while just 23 of the 50 states have Right to Work laws, more than half of the nation's population resides in those 23 Right to Work states.
President Harry Truman said: "You will find some people saying that they are for the so-called right to work law, but they also believe in unions.
Specific attention is paid to staffing patterns in states with right to work laws compared to those without it.
He remained a staunch voice for the open shop ("right to work laws" after Taft-Hartley), until the NEA was unceremoniously dismantled in 1957.
Will he pay off the AFL-CIO by getting involved in an unnecessary, no-win battle over Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act, which authorizes state Right to Work laws? Will he allow the Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, and Ralph Nader's Public Citizen to dictate policy at the EPA, Consumer Product Safety Commission, FDA, FTC, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration?
The job-creating climate of right to work laws has acted as a magnet for workers and, as these states' share of the population has increased, they have become a formidable voting bloc.
States should not need to pass right to work laws to protect themselves from bad Federal labor policy.
Right to work laws prohibit people from being required to join a union as a condition of employment.