Right-to-Work

(redirected from Right to Work Law)
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Related to Right to Work Law: At will employment

Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wisconsins Right to Work law protects freedom, not special interests.
Right to work laws allow workers to obtain the benefits of union representation without paying anything at all.
The primary laborunion argument against Right to Work laws is that such laws create the socalled "free rider" problem, whereby employees who do not join the labor union and pay membership dues will reap the same benefits as those who join the labor union and pay membership dues.
23, 2006) ("On March 22, after a working families' mobilization plan that showed lawmakers just how deeply right to work laws go against the grain of New Hampshire voters, the latest RTW proposal again failed.
21, 1998--Nevada Employees for the Right to Work (NERTW), a non-profit employee education group, is asking hotels and casinos in Las Vegas to allow NERTW to address new employees during orientation to educate them about Nevada's right to work laws.
A Right to Work law prohibits the seizure of any dues or fees from workers who choose not to associate with a union.
Each received an "F" for PLA and prevailing wage mandate policies and failure to adopt Right to Work laws, plus poor marks for workforce development incentive programs.
Table 2: Synthetic Control Method Estimates of the Impact of Right to Work Laws on Two Inequality Measures Top 1% income share LA ID TX OK Panel A: Estimation Statistics Pre-intervention APEMR 0.
Hogler, The Historical Misconception of Right to Work Laws in the United States: Senator Robert Wagner, Legal Policy, and the Decline of American Unions, 23 Hofstra Lab.
Millions of Americans are working overtime and not getting paid for it, with ameliorative efforts fraught with uncertainty So-called Right to Work laws are proliferating and weakening unions.
Twenty-two states have Right to Work laws to limit compulsory unionism; that number will grow, and the decline of labor unions from 33 percent of the workforce in the 1950s to 20 percent in 1980 to 13 percent today will continue.
The job-creating climate of right to work laws has acted as a magnet for workers and, as these states' share of the population has increased, they have become a formidable voting bloc.