Right-to-Work

(redirected from Right to Work Law)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Right to Work Law: At will employment

Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Right to work laws allow workers to obtain the benefits of union representation without paying anything at all.
One of the key provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act allows states to pass Right to Work laws, except for certain industries, such as railroads and airlines.
23, 2006) ("On March 22, after a working families' mobilization plan that showed lawmakers just how deeply right to work laws go against the grain of New Hampshire voters, the latest RTW proposal again failed.").
Right to work laws, meanwhile, permit workers who choose not to belong to a union and not to pay dues to benefit from the collective bargaining of the union in their salary and benefits.
Each received an "F" for PLA and prevailing wage mandate policies and failure to adopt Right to Work laws, plus poor marks for workforce development incentive programs.
Research Serv., Right to Work Laws: Legislative Background and Empirical Research 6-9 (2014), http://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R42575.pdf, but also the notorious difficulty of measuring the impact of "right-to-work" laws.
For example, we talked about some of the underlying reasons that union members--and members of the larger public--might themselves be sympathetic to the attacks on unions embodied in Right to Work laws.
Twenty-two states have Right to Work laws to limit compulsory unionism; that number will grow, and the decline of labor unions from 33 percent of the workforce in the 1950s to 20 percent in 1980 to 13 percent today will continue.
Specific attention is paid to staffing patterns in states with right to work laws compared to those without it.
He remained a staunch voice for the open shop ("right to work laws" after Taft-Hartley), until the NEA was unceremoniously dismantled in 1957.
Will he pay off the AFL-CIO by getting involved in an unnecessary, no-win battle over Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act, which authorizes state Right to Work laws? Will he allow the Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, and Ralph Nader's Public Citizen to dictate policy at the EPA, Consumer Product Safety Commission, FDA, FTC, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration?
The Workplace Democracy Act restores real bargaining rights to workers and repeals the right to work laws like those that Governor Walker has used to undercut American workers.