Right to Privacy


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Right to Privacy

The right not to be violated without one's consent. For example, the right to privacy includes the right to be secure in one's own person or home. The right to privacy in guaranteed in many jurisdictions. Other jurisdictions that do not explicitly provide a right to privacy may provide some protections. For example, a government may prohibit searches in a private area without a warrant.
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In many other cases, our legal right to privacy is seen by the courts an inferred right rather than an explicit one.
He wrote, "SC upholds the right to privacy Nothing vague or amorphous about it.
The apex court said after the nine-judge bench decides whether right to privacy was a fundamental right or not, then all matters relating to the Aadhaar scheme will go back to the original three-judge bench.
right to privacy vis- a- vis government, right to privacy visa- vis press and right to know information.
The dissenters (Justices Consuelo Ynares-Santiago and Adolfo Azcuna) reiterated the right to privacy arguments of J.
In the opinion of Nighat Dad, the Executive Director of Digital Rights Foundation, 'if the Government of Pakistan is serious about strengthening cyber security, it is vital that there is stringent and proactive data protection legislation that complements and factors in the right to privacy and freedom of expression of its citizens.
Following this, the government will have to prove Aadhaar can restrain right to privacy on the grounds of dissemination of social benefits or national security.
The significance of right to privacy, the impact of its denial and the relevance of the judgment can be explained through a few examples.
Another Supreme Court case is waiting in the wings that may have additional implications for how tech companies will be treated under the newfound right to privacy.
Sharma (1962) and Kharak Singh (1954) judgement and held that the Right to Privacy is a fundamental right under Article 21 of the Indian Constitution, in a unanimous decision (of the nine-judge bench).
Even in the course of the hearing by the nine-judge bench on the nature of the right to privacy, it was made clear that the bench would only decide on the correctness or otherwise of the judgements pronounced in 1954 by an eight-judge bench and in 1962 by a six-judge bench that the right to privacy was not a fundamental right.
This verdict brings right to privacy at par with the right to liberty and will make it harder for anyone, including private corporations or government agencies, to obtain private data from users.