Rifle Approach


Also found in: Idioms.

Rifle Approach

A marketing strategy that focuses on only one target. That is, a rifle approach attempts to market a product to a small, narrowly defined demographic. See also: Shotgun Approach.
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It's the silliest trick you ever saw," he said, "but it's very useful for breathing and singing in the water.
Here some light-minded person may exclaim against the truth of this statement; they will say that there is not in all France a girl so silly as to be ignorant of the art of angling for men; that Mademoiselle Cormon is one of those monstrous exceptions which commonsense should prevent a writer from using as a type; that the most virtuous and also the silliest girl who desires to catch her fish knows well how to bait the hook.
From all that I can collect by your manner of talking, you must be two of the silliest girls in the country.
Silliest word in our language, and one knows so well the popular idea of health.
It's the silliest lie a sensible man like you ever believed, to say a woman makes a house comfortable.
Well, that," he said, "that's the silliest part of the whole silly story.
There we have two specimens of these Neapolitans--two of the silliest possible frauds, which half the population religiously and faithfully believed, and the other half either believed also or else said nothing about, and thus lent themselves to the support of the imposture.
You're the silliest fool I ever knew," he said bluntly, "but I suppose you'll worry me into a fever if you don't have your own way.
Polly shut her door hard, and felt ready to cry with vexation, that her pleasure should be spoilt by such a silly idea; for, of all the silly freaks of this fast age, that of little people playing at love is about the silliest.
But I do think that writing take-notices up on the wall about the boys and girls is the silliest ever.
The last one they had was, and his wife was the silliest, flightiest little thing I ever saw.
That any but the weakest and silliest of people could have seen in one interview that Lord Verisopht, though he was a lord, and Sir Mulberry Hawk, though he was a baronet, were not persons accustomed to be the best possible companions, and were certainly not calculated by habits, manners, tastes, or conversation, to shine with any very great lustre in the society of ladies, need scarcely be remarked.