Ride-Along

(redirected from Ride-Alongs)

Ride-Along

In marketing, a small sample of a product that is sent in the mail along with a periodical. Ride-alongs are intended to entice recipients to want more of the product and therefore to buy it.
References in periodicals archive ?
McKee, the police lieutenant, said it's a busy time of year for ride-alongs with officers on patrol, mainly with department recruits and citizen police academy members.
Although price and profit took a backseat to tastings and ride-alongs, it was still a prevalent theme throughout the survey responses, as was whether a wine fit into the distributors' portfolios.
LARRY WALKER, Colorado outfielder, on why he wears a bulletproof vest on his civilian "ride-alongs" with the police in his spare time: "You never know when a serial killer may decide to pop by for a visit."
[2] As a result, the question of whether media ride-alongs violate the Fourth Amendment and, if so, to what extent are individual law enforcement officers liable, has remained unanswered.
But somewhere in between these two kinds of ride-alongs - on the public street or inside the home - there are gray areas in the wake of the Supreme Court's rulings.
But the fact that the Court's holding on this issue (that the rule wasn't clear until the Court's decision) provoked a vigorous dissent - that of Justice John Paul Stevens who essentially argued that any idiot should have known of the ban on ride-alongs - will likely chill many journalists who have long defended and promoted ride-alongs.
With the high cost of direct mail and the relatively inexpensive cost of alternate print media, marketers should consider the multitude of alternative options available to them, including statement stuffers, ride-alongs, package inserts and co-ops - to name a few.
It merely found that, as of April 1992, the law had not clearly declared ride-alongs unconstitutional.
In conjunction with lectures, instructors should use demonstrations, facility tours, and hands-on activities (e.g., role-plays, ride-alongs) when possible--as well as additional aids, such as videos, slides, audio cassettes, overheads, and posters.
This court action comes a little more than a week after the high court ruled that news media "ride-alongs" violated the Fourth Amendment's privacy protections.
Media ride-alongs always served the mutual interests of media and police; law enforcement agencies liked the publicity, and the media got action-packed footage or photos.
Supreme Court has applied the brakes to journalists' "ride-alongs" with police.