Revocable


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The revocable trust bought the residence for $679,000 in January 2017/
On Morrissette's death, her revocable trust/payor owned the right to receive the greater of the premiums paid or the cash value of each policy on the death of the child.
GRAF EDWARD M GHERARDI REVOCABLE DB&G HOLDING CO LLC
The assets in a revocable trust remain in the grantor's estate, so if they're close to qualifying for the federal estate tax, those assets could easily push them over the limit.
The Morey decision is not the only judicial opinion deciding the potential loss of creditor protection with respect to the payment of insurance proceeds to a revocable trust.
A revocable trust can provide another valuable benefit: you can use it as a form of incapacity protection.
When a revocable life insurance trust is created, the policy owner typically reserves all of the ownership rights in the policies and, unless the trust is funded with income producing assets, the policyowner will continue to be responsible to pay all premiums.
Where the client wishes to avoid ancillary administration of assets situated in other states by placing title to those assets in the trustee of a revocable living trust.
Where a husband and wife established a revocable trust into which the husband transferred all of his separate property, and the trust agreement provided that the property transferred to the trust is community property unless husband or wife as transferor identifies it as separate property, the husband did not transmute separate property to community property because the trust agreement provision was not an "express declaration" of the intent to create a transmutation within the meaning of Family Code Sec.
Two basic differences have led me to choose a revocable living trust.
It's been sold to the Klein Family Revocable Trust of Brentwood for $15.
Cowles Legal Systems' Trust Plus creates wills, irrevocable trusts, and revocable trusts, including funding documents, state-specific supporting documents such as powers of attorney (financial and health care), deeds, etc.