reverse engineering

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reverse engineering

a situation where a firm obtains a competitor's product so as to disassemble it and from the resultant component analysis decide how to build a similar product.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
Reverse engineering unknown or undocumented protocols formats are technique that requires a lot of information and knowledge to completely and successively reverse engineer an unknown protocol.
When conducting a reverse engineering activity, the reverse engineer follows a certain process.
Whether the awareness arises from the lessons of a leadership guru, the systematic dismantling of the latest tech device or the blister-raising dreams of a young Jeff Beck wannabe, the technique is the same: Seek out the latest and greatest examples of where you want to create value, and then reverse engineer the heck out of it.
They looked at a number of other scanning options and selected NVision's handheld laser scanner because of its ability to move freely around a part, making it possible to reverse engineer parts of almost any size or shape.
For example, when a company, like Sega, licenses other software companies to use its code to produce games compatible with the Sega video game system, these companies often must promise not to attempt to reverse engineer any of Sega's codes for use in other games.
In order to reverse engineer most technologies, there is no need to actually copy the product; one only needs to purchase a number of examples of the product and then take them apart.(50) When a computer program is reverse engineered, however, a number of copyright violations occur in the process.
You emphasise the point that it can undercut the OEM, and that it can reverse engineer a design in a matter of hours.
* Reducing the cost and time needed to reverse engineer obsolete parts.
At first glance, the need to reverse engineer one's own systems seems to be an admission of failure, If our systems did what we wanted them to, we would not need to change them, and so we would not need reverse engineering if we had sufficiently complete records of how our systems work.
However, a designer can read in Gerber artwork, reverse engineer it into a fully intelligent layout design in a matter of hours, and then use Intercept's Palindrome Reverse Engineering option to build a schematic for that layout (using library symbol and part information, or by automatically generating parts and symbols) in the Mozaix schematic capture application.
One project it has supported has enabled Stuart Brown, a student at the Open University, to reverse engineer the most iconic of vintage racing cars: the Type 35 Bugatti.