Respite Care


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Respite Care

Occasional or temporary care that a nurse or nurse's aide gives to an elderly or disabled person. Some health insurance policies may provide coverage for respite care, and it has been known to reduce the risk of abuse or neglect that comes from putting a loved one in a nursing home.
References in periodicals archive ?
The charity Revitalise offers respite care for carers and the disabled person they care for.
Through the Harbor Regional Center respite care program, ComForcare will now be offering the services of their trained home care specialists.
He said: "It was an invaluable opportunity to talk to sta that provide this highly valued and nationally recognised respite care service to people from across the region.
He goes on to say it is "simply not true" to assert that respite care has been withdrawn, adding: "This illustrates the way in which inflammatory statements and rumours have been used to foment discontent.
Why not help support us, our respite care and other facilities by taking part in this year's Bark in the Park at Preston Park on May 12?
DEFINITELY look into respite care - ask your GP for recommendations of what's available in your area.
Not only does respite care provide a break for foster parents, it also may provide a challenging opportunity for foster children to have an added degree of independence and allow them to experience relationships with people outside their customary environment.
As the population ages and more people than ever before are in need of respite care, we are urging respite service providers to pay more attention to the quality of respite care they provide in order to put carers' minds at ease and enable them to make the most of the respite opportunities they so richly deserve.
A report to be presented to Wirral council's ruling cabinet this week says there is sufficient interest and capacity from good-quality providers of residential and nursing home care, intermediate care and respite care to accommodate services currently being provided to older people and people with learning disabilities at Meadowcroft, Pensall, Poulton, Manor Road and Mapleholme.
Jeon, Brodaty, and Chesterson (2005) found that respite care provided several benefits, "which included time to rest and relax, freedom to pursue other activities, improved self-esteem, feeling secure about possible breakdown of care arrangements, improvement in family relationships, and sleep patterns" (p.
In December 2006, the Lifespan Respite Care Act of 2006 (LRCA) was enacted to improve the delivery and quality of respite care services available to families across age and disability groups by establishing coordinated lifespan respite systems.
Until a month ago, the Reiss family received 130 hours a month of state-funded respite care under a program that helps families raise disabled children.