Republican

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Republican

A person who believes or participates in a polity governed by elected officials. In a republic, the citizens elect representatives who vote on issues of governance. Often, republics are called democracies, in which citizens themselves vote on issues of governance, but the two terms are not identical.
References in periodicals archive ?
Starting in the late 1960s and continuing through 2004, Republicans posted consistent, steady gains in standard measures of partisan support, as shown in Figure I.
No, this was the outlook in the early morning hours of November 8, 2006 after voters swept Republicans out of office and turned the formerly "red" Republican Granite State a deep Democratic "blue." For Democrats it was, "Happy Days Are Here Again." For Republicans, it was some variation of the Crystal Gayle hit of the late '70s, "Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue."
Polls showed not just Democrats but Republicans and independents opposed to the Schiavo intervention.
Thomas began his mid-November column with a provocative question: "If God is on the side of conservative Christians and conservative Christians are on the side of the Republican Party, shouldn't Republicans have done better in the recent election?"
elections are decided on a winner-take-all basis, but the Republicans take that truism quite literally.
REPUBLICANS ARE COUNTING ON holding on to power in the November elections by looking tough on terror.
Arizona, where Jim Pederson is getting very close to two-term Republican incumbent Jon Kyl, much to the Republicans' dismay.
Given the volatile, unpredictable nature of presidential politics, only a fool at this early stage would feel certain they know who the nominee in either party will be, but it's a good bet that Republicans will not nominate a presidential candidate in 2008 who is pro-choice on the abortion issue and in favor of many gay rights and gun control measures.
It seems quite amazing that the Log Cabin Republicans would choose not to endorse George W.
Reflecting on the persistent media interest in his donations to Democratic organizations like ACT, and the resultant Republican ire he generated, George Soros quipped, "I think I may have ended up raising more money for the Republicans" (The Christian Science Monitor, Aug.
If nothing else, the often overlooked election of 1912 proved that the right candidate--in this case, a larger-than-life former President coming out of retirement to run an insurgent campaign--could give the Republicans and Democrats a serious run for their money.

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