Repaired


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Repaired

In numismatics, describing a damaged coin that has been fixed. A repaired coin generally is worth more than a damaged coin, but is not as valuable as a coin in mint condition or even a used coin that has never been damaged.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 -- 2 -- color) At top, a sidewalk on Bassett Street in West Hills is scheduled to be repaired.
Typically, these were used parts that had been replaced or exchanged and repaired at FedEx's cost during an earlier ESV, stored and returned to FedEx engines at no additional cost.
The Select Service providers offer State Farm customers added-value services and uses inspectors to verify the repairs on a certain percentage of vehicles repaired in Select Service facilities.
In this example, only 40 percent of all I-level induction are repaired at the I-Level because I-level shops cannot rewind and balance the rotor.
13) Under the Plainfield-Union test for determining whether a repair adds value, extends the life, or adapts property to a new use, the status of the repaired software immediately after the expenditure is compared with the status of the asset prior to the condition necessitating the expenditure.
The idea is to identify, through vehicle inspections, those cars that are really dirty and then require that they be repaired to reduce their emissions.
However, he warns, "only 10% of the population regularly gets their shoes repaired.
However, since virtually all repairs increase the repaired property's value (and marketability), the proper standard in this determination is the property's value after the expenditure compared with its value before the corrective action was discovered.
We chose to maintain our channel furnace with ceramic welding because the repaired section holds a lot longer than gunning the refractory materials.
Puget Sound Energy has now successfully repaired the core backbone of our system - our high-voltage transmission grid - and restored power to more than 530,000 of the 700,000 customers who lost service after last week's unprecedented windstorm," said Sue McLain, senior vice president of Operations.
After a roofing contractor repaired the roof approximately five or six times a year until 1961 without charging the tenant, both he and the building's general contractor refused to make any further repairs.