Rentier


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Rentier

1. A person who makes most or all of his/her income from the rental or property.

2. A state or government that has access to a great deal of liquidity and uses it to maintain hegemony over its population. For example, it may provide free or inexpensive health care using its excess money. Rentier states rarely assess taxes, and often acquire their liquidity through the sale of their natural resources, such as oil. Citizens of rentier states often (though not always) have little loyalty to these countries, which may go through difficult transition periods when the natural resources run out. See also: Rents.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The transition from rentierism to state capitalism in the sector is blocked by the intervening process of rentier capitalism.
12) Money accompanies the evolution from one state to the next for each of the Balzacian figures; this is more than ever the case with the financial figure par excellence, "le rentier.
In this context, rentier capitalism in a mask for rentierism, invented by the owners of E&P technologies to blur the visibility of surplus appropriation in the oil sector.
Rentier state models attempt to explain why state decisionmakers in natural resource-rich economies create and maintain growth-restricting policies.
To compensate for these great disparities in society and to protect the position of the parasitical rentier ruling class, the latter pursues alliances with, multi-billion dollar arms corporations, and military protection from the dominant (USA) imperial power.
Many of the country's future challenges relate closely to the rentier economy and the sociopolitical system it has created: the high dependence on oil and other external revenues for economic stability, the growing population and unsuccessful human-resources-management strategies, and high levels of natural resource consumption that have lead to a weak environmental record as well as a domestic energy and water crisis.
A part of the rentier state literature focuses on the smaller states of the Arabian Peninsula and Saudi Arabia where the pre-oil economies were either very weak or not greatly integrated (Beblawi 1990, Luciani 1990 and Luciani 1994).
Just as, in Voltaire's phrase, the rich require an abundant supply of the poor, so too does the rentier class require an abundant supply of debtors.
A rentier nullity, a socialite painter of dismal attainments.
However you look at it--welfare for the rentier class, a legal mare's-nest that will enrich lawyers, a deficit deepener--Bush's tax-cut plan is a lousy idea.
Herb's foil is rentier theory, a fiscal sociology of the state that argues the character of a state's revenue determines a country's basic politics.
Chaudhry and Vandewalle both argue that what makes these countries similar to each other and distinct from most others is not merely their status as rentier states but also the timing of their accession to this status.