Remainder Man

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Remainder Man

The person or organization that receives what remains of a trust at its dissolution. That is, once all obligations to the beneficiary have been satisfied and all expenses have been paid, the remainder man receives the rest of the assets in the trust. The remainder man only receives these assets at the end of the trust's life; it may or may not be the same person as the trustor.
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The following powers provided by a trust instrument to the grantor did not disqualify a charitable remainder unitrust: (1) the power to terminate all or a portion of the trust early and distribute the trust corpus to any charity, (2) the power to change the charitable remainderpersons, (3) the power to limit the type of assets the trust may accept or hold (provided the restriction did not violate Treas.
The IRS has privately ruled that the donor/unitrust recipient of a CRUT could donate his entire unitrust interest in an existing CRUT to the charitable remainderperson in consideration for a gift annuity that would be payable to him.
The gift tax cost is exactly the same as if the grantor had made a direct gift of the property to the remainderpersons.
Under the Revised Uniform Principal and Income Act, the trustee could then allocate some of that appreciation to income to make up for the smaller yield, subject to the trustee's fiduciary duty to treat the income beneficiary and the remainderpersons fairly.
The trustees had only those powers that the trust instrument expressly granted, which were typically few, since the trustees' job was simply to hold and then to convey to the remainderpersons.
These remainderpersons had during the settlor's lifetime precisely that bare expectancy that characterizes the interest of a devisee under the will of a living testator.
The terms provide for a successor trustee to be appointed at the settlor's death, to hold and manage the property for the benefit of the remainderpersons.
The primary disadvantage of using a QPRT is that the trust's remainderpersons do not get a step-up in basis for the home when the term interest holders (e.
From an income tax standpoint, the QPRT loses some of its attractiveness if the remainderpersons intend to sell the home once they take possession (assuming the transferor survives until his term interest expires).
If the holder of a right to make a current withdrawal from the trust allows the amount the holder could take to instead stay inside the trust, the holder is really making a gift to those who will eventually receive those amounts, the trust's remainderpersons.