Nationalism

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Nationalism

The philosophy in which one promotes the interests of one's own country or ethnic group over others. For example, nationalism may advocate secession of a region to form a new country in which one's own ethnic group predominates. What qualifies as a "nation" in nationalist terms is a matter of some disagreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his opening chapter, he asks, "How have religious nationalism and radical secularism come to exert so much influence over our public life?
Religious nationalism politicises religion but it seldom democratises society.
Modern religious nationalism is equally destructive in its impact on nations.
The Independence Club, an umbrella organ of Korean progressives that included Neo-Confucianists and non-religious intellectuals as well as Christians, was not established by the students and graduates of a Christian school, and did not serve as a forum for religious nationalism (64).
9/11 invigorated the expansionist agenda of Korean Pentecostal/evangelical missionaries who are steeped in the ideas of "global spiritual conquest", (60) mainly shaped by "Korean Christian Zionism", as a mixture of evangelical fundamentalism and ideological religious nationalism.
Whether the rise of religion and/or religious nationalism (22) contributes to stability or tension in the society and what kind of role religion and/or religious nationalism play in integration or disintegration of the society are important questions in the construction and maintenance of the nation and national unity.
He was, however, too intelligent and too much of a liberal not to understand that religious nationalism is inherently anti-minorities.
That view has been shifting since a wave of religious nationalism was unleashed by the seemingly miraculous nature of Israel's victory in the Six-Day war.
Delivering a speech in a meeting of his party Justice and Development Party in northeastern province of Rize, Erdogan said that they were against regional, ethnic and religious nationalism.
As Juergensmeyer tells us in his first and highly influential book, The New Cold War: Religious Nationalism Confronts the Secular State (1993), "religious nationalism" is the synthesis of religion and the idea of the nation-state.
Indeed, as the book explains, far from extenuating in importance, religious nationalism acquired new forms of expression in a post-communist milieu.
She argues that the problem of how religious nationalism affects the largest democracy in the world is instructive for all democracies.