Regionalism


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Regionalism

In political science, the ideology that seeks to decentralize government, or at least promote the interests of a given set of groups. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
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Bianculli takes readers to regionalism case of Latin America.
Regionalism as an essential field developed in the 1950's, especially in Europe.
The study is split into three parts: forces of change, the development of institutions for self-government, and regionalism and change.
Although the network metaphor has been exhausted, this characterization anticipates the emergence of "regionalism without regions": collaborations among multiple state and federal actors that need not involve contiguous areas.
Regionalism and regionalization then find expression essentially in the economic and security domains, including convergent motivations toward security and economic forms of regional integration and regional governance, alongside the normative or ideational cultural domains.
Brazilian regionalism is asymmetrical because there are deep material differences between Brazil and the rest, its government uses the region as a platform to project itself globally and its partners are unable to balance Brazil (Beeson, 2010).
Following this, regional integration in Latin America has experienced an active but fuzzy path, giving way to a third wave of integration and regionalism. In addition to the proliferation of North-South PTAs, the development of a new kind of regionalism emerged in Latin American and particularly in South America during this wave.
Practices focusing on social policy and new standards for political and social cohesion in the construction of regionalism were setting (2).
With notions such as memory, identity, regionalism, and nationhood, the text would benefit from some theoretical considerations or at least an engagement with studies outside of the field of Japanese history that combine all of these (Alon Confino's work comes to mind).
In the past decade, scholars have argued that the emergence of the New Left governments in the Latin American region marked an effort to bring a new political, economic and social agenda to Latin American regionalism because open regionalism failed to respond to the challenges of stable growth.
The essence of Husain's argument is that the British evolved a coherent vision of regionalism in their approach primarily to the Middle East and South Asia whereas the emerging American conceptualization of these geographic spaces and attendant foreign polices proved less coherent.
Russell also helpfully places what he calls Heaney's regionalism in the context of the regionalisms of other poets, among them principally Ted Hughes, Philip Larkin, Edwin Muir, Sorley MacLean, and to a lesser extent Robert Frost.