ROI

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ROI

Return on Investment

The money that a person or company earns as a percentage of the total value of his/her/its assets that are invested. It is calculated thusly:

Return on investment = (Income - Cost) / Cost

Because it is easy to calculate the return on investment, it is a relatively popular measure of the profitability on an investment and can help in making investment decisions.

ROI

return on investment (ROI)

A generic term to define a number of analytical tools for measuring the financial benefits of an investment, including cash-on-cash, internal rate of return, equity dividend,and financial management rate of return.

References in periodicals archive ?
For example, a traditional white light immediately reflects off a glass-based package in the region of interest, creates a blank, and prevents the viewing of that component.
Hence, this approach is known as Region of Interest Vector Quantization (ROIVQ) image compression.
So a new image compression scheme called region of interest (ROI) coding was presented in [1]-[7].
Technical quality and limitations of the study, stating why a specific site or region of interest (ROI) is invalid or not included.
Spectral tables for four cosmically abundant elements (Ne, Mg, Si, and S) in the wavelength region of interest for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which is roughly 2 nm to 17 nm, have been critically compiled with partial support from the Chandra Emission Line Project.
With existing viewing tools it is difficult to understand how, when zoomed into a detailed region of interest, this information relates to the rest of the data set that would otherwise have been zoomed off the screen.
Values of uptake of each brain region of interest of the 3 autistic groups are then compared with those of the normal group to look for any abnormality.
One way that astronomers measure cosmic magnetic field strengths is by detecting how light from more distant quasars rotates its angle of polarization as it travels through a region of interest, say a galaxy or galaxy cluster.
Joseph's, Minnesota, Clemson, Louisville, Texas, Providence or Tennessee-Chattanooga are left to suck on a lemon since Southern California's region of interest isn't interested in those schools -- outside an occasional peek or the dreaded split-screen (which helps no one).

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