Refundable Credit

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Refundable Credit

A direct, dollar-for-dollar reduction of one's tax liability in which one still receives a tax refund even if one's liability drops below zero. That is, if a taxpayer otherwise owes $2,000 to the government, but takes $3,000 in refundable credits, then the government owes $1,000 to the taxpayer. Relatively few tax credits are refundable; most are limited to the amount of one's tax liability. However, the earned income tax credit is a common example of a refundable credit.

Refundable Credit

A credit for which the IRS will send the taxpayer a refund for any amount in excess of the taxpayer's tax liability.
References in periodicals archive ?
deductions for federal refundable tax credits. The amounts by which
While both are nice, refundable tax credits offer the better deal because they can reduce your tax liability below zero, so you could get a refund even if you don't owe any taxes.
Require a work-authorized Social Security Number (SSN) to claim refundable tax credits, like the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or the Child Tax Credit:
One explanation for a delayed refund is increased scrutiny of returns that include certain refundable tax credits. The Protecting Americans From Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015, P.L.
The Old Dominion State offers military locations (the Pentagon, the Norfolk Naval Shipyard), colonial heritage (Williamsburg, Jamestown), and picturesque landscapes (the Appalachian Mountains, Atlantic coast beaches), as well as refundable tax credits. There are also discretionary grants that are decided by the governor for projects that bring revenue and added value to the state.
376 (2013), by specifying that refundable tax credits are taken into account as a negative amount of tax when calculating the penalty.
Pipes notes in the section on refundable tax credits that lawmakers who have proposed refundable tax credit measures in the past include Rep.
The current system of refundable tax credits delivered through the tax system began to take its current form in the early 1990s with introduction of the Canada Child Tax Benefit and the Goods and Services Tax Credit.
"At stake is 12 years of refundable tax credits worth up to $3,000 per year for each W-2 employee involved in a qualifying relocation.
There is a complaint that the current system of retirement savings tax deductions goes only to "the rich" and a suggestion that the way to fix this problem would be to go to a system of refundable tax credits. Under a refundable tax credit system, even someone who pays no income tax would be paid by the federal government (given a "tax refund") to save.
To help working families afford coverage, advanceable and refundable tax credits should be available, phasing out as income approaches 400 percent of the federal poverty line.