recourse loan

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Recourse Loan

A loan for which there is a co-signer. That is, if the borrower defaults on the loan, the co-signer becomes legally liable for repayment. Thus, in addition to any collateral that may or may not secure the loan, the lender is further protected from default by the existence of the co-signer. See also: Non-recourse loan.
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recourse loan

A loan in which the lender can claim more than the collateral as repayment in the event that payments on the loan are stopped. Thus, a recourse loan places the borrower's personal assets at risk. Compare nonrecourse loan.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recourse Loans: Approximately 84.5% of the loans in the pool are full or partial recourse to the loan sponsor.
With traditional patient financing programs, such as recourse loans or payment plans, the patient's financial liability remains on the hospital's balance sheet, so a patient's default results in bad debt to the hospital.
ABC has a full-deal execution capability covering non-recourse and recourse loans (senior and junior).
NAA/NMHC and a coalition of trade groups have filed a "friend of the court" brief in an important case pending before the Michigan Supreme Court that could have a chilling effect on conduit borrowers, including apartment firms, by converting non-recourse loans into recourse loans (Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
Such liabilities (member recourse loans) are not partner nonrecourse debt as defined under Regs.
1.704-2 do not apply to deductions that are financed by member recourse loans, deductions that are financed by these loans must be allocated in accordance with the general rules under Regs.
In the case of member recourse loans, the liability does not fall squarely within the definition of partner nonrecourse debt under Regs.
Typical of commercial lending a couple of years ago were recourse loans at a 50 percent loan-to-value (LTV).
Rosenberg, president of Mega Funding International, called the recourse loans "a hair in somebody's soup." But he said people in the U.S.
In non-recourse loans, some "bad boy" provisions have the effect of converting the non-recourse loan to a full recourse loan such that the borrower becomes liable for the full amount of the loan.
In the case of a recourse loan, the borrower has given an agreement to the lender to repay the debt.
The default of a recourse loan is quite serious, because other assets of the property owner/borrower, whether an individual or a corporation, are liable for the remaining debt and might be seized by the lender.