Real

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Real

Used in the context of general equities. (1) natural, (2) not dividend roll-or program trading-related; (3) not tax-related. "Real" indications have three major repercussions: a) pricing will be more favorable to the other side of the trade since an investment bank is not committing any capital; b) price pressure will be stronger if real since a natural buyer/seller may have information leading to his decision or more behind it, and c) an uptick may be required for the trader to transact if the indication is not real and the trader has no long position.

Real

1. Describing a variable that takes inflation into account. For example, when considering GDP growth, if GDP has grown 10% in dollar terms, and the inflation rate is 3%, real GDP growth is only 7%. See also: Nominal.

2. See: Tangible.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tourism industry's direct contribution is expected to grow by 3 percent per year in real terms during the 2012-2022 period compared to a 4.
5 per cent per year in real terms between 2010-11 and 2014-15 (or 13.
We predict the GDP in real terms to grow by 5 percent in 2010, because our oil production is expected to be higher this year," he said.
The Lib Dems have said they would change the regulated fare formula to RPI minus 1 per cent so that fares should come down in real terms every year.
With little or no cash increase, from 2011/12, the NHS will need to plan for real terms funding to fall by 2.
I interviewed the Chancellor on Wednesday and he said the drink price increases weren't a hardship because alcohol today is cheaper in real terms - whatever that means.
The bad news, though, is that the rate in real terms, discounted for inflation over the next 12 months, continues to be highest on the planet: 9% at press time.
9 percent in real terms in the first quarter year-on-year, the government said.
1% in real terms to 779m [pounds sterling], bolstered by a 4.
4% in real terms over the comparable quarter in 2000.
In real terms (values are adjusted by the change in the CPI at 1.
Bolstered by the gains in these sectors, the four-quarter rise in the final purchases of households and businesses amounted to about 5 percent in real terms in 1993, matching the large 1992 rise.