Ready, Fire, Aim


Also found in: Acronyms.

Ready, Fire, Aim

A slang term for the practice of putting a product on the market before it is ready. This is done either to impress investors or to meet an unrealistic deadline set by management. Sometimes, it is accompanied by a promise to fix the product later.
References in periodicals archive ?
In organizational planning we call this the "ready, fire, aim" approach.
Michael Fullan has described the process of acquiring a concrete image as proceeding through the stages of "ready, fire, aim." He alters the expected sequence so that innovators can "fire" before they have perfected their aim.
Don't become immobilized by planning and analysis - management is action, not study or reflection: "ready, fire, aim," "do it, fix it, try it," "inspire, empower, lead," rather than "deliberate and administer." Action is always better than the dreaded "paralysis by analysis." Successful managers get their people to move, and from movement evolves strategy as decisions are made in real time.
Managers who talk tough, who say that they are "action oriented," who use the expression, "ready, fire, aim." Those who say, "We don't have the time to analyze this problem to death." Managers who have not demonstrated the skills to get to the root causes of problems, who sneer at those who attempt to use their CQI program.
This is what is referred to as the "ready, fire, aim" approach to building a new facility or addition.
On the flip side, MBA programs also have come under criticism for a "ready, fire, aim" approach to curriculum development.
His philosophy is Ready, Fire, Aim, safe in the knowledge that someone else will have to sort out the details in a decades time.
Without innate capacity, we often end up spinning our wheels in a game of "ready, fire, aim."
Quite candidly, we were also concerned that, inasmuch as the Treasury Department and IRS had not undertaken to quantify the scope of the so-called corporate tax shelter program or even to define what was meant by the term "corporate tax shelter," the Administration might legitimately be criticized as engaging in a "ready, fire, aim" exercise.
Although the budget process often does not permit a studied review of statutory language, in an area as important as this one it would be a mistake to say "ready, fire, aim."
The Treasury's failure in this regard is especially disappointing inasmuch as both it and the staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation have studies of the Internal Revenue Code's entire penalty regime underway -- perhaps the legislative equivalent of "ready, fire, aim!"