Disability

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Related to Reading disability: dyslexia, reading disorder

Disability

1. Any brokerage account with a restriction, or the restrictions themselves. Disabilities exist generally to prevent conflicts of interest in investment. For example, an employee of the brokerage may be unable to make certain transactions on his account with the brokerage.

2. See: Disability insurance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reading disability the children experience especially during reading makes it necessary to deal with the issue from a different perspective.
6% co-occurrence of mathematical learning disability with that of reading disability.
Pairwise comparisons revealed that U3 students reported greater reading disability than U1 (p = .
For all of these reasons, inclusion of sound blending test data as part of a reading disability evaluation becomes problematic.
Reading Disability, Behavior Problems and Juvenile Delinquency.
Therefore, before the intervention, we reviewed the reading disability literature for constructs with strong predictive validity other than phonemic awareness, letter knowledge, word identification, and reading fluency.
In past years, studies have indicated that the incidence of reading disability varies anywhere from 4 per cent to 6 per cent (Sofie & Riccio, 2002) to 38 per cent (Aaron et al.
Although Joe will always have to cope with a reading disability, he began the transformation from being a reluctant reader to a young boy who is enthusiastic about reading.
While the phonological-core-deficit hypothesis of reading disability is also widely accepted in transparent orthographies, it is insufficient to capture the richness and heterogeneity of the different profiles of dyslexics, with the result that some children learning to read a transparent orthography often do not receive appropriate diagnosis, classification, and treatment (Katzir et al.
One strategy encourages reading motivation for children with language delays; the other targets children with a family history of reading disability, encouraging talk that facilitates children's understanding of print concepts, phonological awareness and alphabet knowledge.
This review shows that there is an extensive array of published research literature on dyslexia because it is arguably the most common form of neurobehavioral reading disability (Shaywitz, 2003).