Reader Response

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Reader Response

In print media, a measure of reader interest in an advertisement based on the number of letters and other communications the magazine or periodical receives in relation to the ad.
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10) Petric, "The Reader(s) and the Bible(s) 'Reader versus Community' in Reader-Response Criticism and Biblical Interpretation", 58ss.
For other studies exploring the connections between reader-response criticism and medieval texts see David Lyle Jeffrey, 'John Wyclif and the Hermeneutics of Reader Response', Interpretation, 39 (1985), 272-87; Medieval Texts and Contemporary Readers, eds Laurie A.
provides an objective "grammar" for describing what is happening within some NT texts, and the precision distinguishes his model from the broader categories of reader-response criticism applied to Gospels as a whole.
In theory, the school of reader-response criticism aspired to recapture the perceptions of literary works in the minds of readers of previous centuries, but in fact, especially for the Middle Ages and Renaissance, they did so solely on the basis of texts as presented in modern editions.
Th e authors provide a good introduction to the issues at stake in the critical interpretation of the Bible, without discussing some contemporary issues such as postmodern interpretation, reader-response criticism, feminist interpretation, and the like.
Martin's, 1995), with its packed essay on the "Critical History of Gulliver's Travels" essay on "Biographical and Historical Contexts," its brief introductions and bibliography on Feminist Criticism, New Historicism, Deconstruction, Reader-Response Criticism, and Psychoanalytic Criticism, and the five articles chosen or written precisely to analyze Swift's text from one of these contemporary critical perspectives.
In addition to its connection to the work of Cathy Davidson, this collection is beholden to the work of Janice Radway, who pushed the boundaries of reader-response criticism and examined actual readers' experiences and interactions with texts.
Drawing on the reader-response criticism of Wolfgang Iser and other critics who maintain that the reader himself is an active producer of meaning, Kallendorf sees ideological formation not as a top-down process in which texts in Louis Althusser's paradigm "interpellate" readers but instead as a dialectic between readers and their books.
O'Beirne then reviews various theories of reader-response criticism to ask what happens when real, not ideal, readers confront the text with their "irreducibly other" perspectives.
Curiously, Scarry's text shows no awareness of the influential reader-response criticism that has appeared in the past twenty years Gibson, Riffaterre, Poulet, Iser, Culler, Holland, Bleich, Fish, and Michaels appear neither in the text nor in the index.
looks to Burton like a long harbinger of reader-response criticism half
From the point of view of newer approaches in the field of biblical studies, such as ideological criticism or reader-response criticism, this kind of historical criticism may appear as somewhat outdated.