Homo Economicus

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Homo Economicus

A person that desires to maximize his/her needs or desires. Homo economicus is used most of the time to refer to the rational economic actor, who desires wealth, does not desire to work if it can be avoided, and is able to find ways achieve those ends. This assumption is accepted by many economists, especially those who follow rational choice theory, but it remains controversial. The concept of homo economicus was developed by utilitarian thinkers, and contrasts with the constructs of behavioral economics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original annuity puzzle centered on Yaari's (1965) prediction that a rational investor without a bequest motive would only purchase annuity assets.
These empirical anomalies contradict the efficient market and rational investor hypotheses that are basic to several pricing models.
The lesson: for a rational investor who thinks in terms of the business behind the stock, the best time to buy is when it is available at a deep discount to its value.
Having taken into consideration the relative risk of making an investment into a particular business compared to investing the same money into a low risk, guaranteed return investment such as government bonds, the WACC represents the return or yield a rational investor would reasonably expect to receive when investing money in that business.
In an interview published in Les Echos, on 12 July 2002, the French economy and finance minister said he was willing to take "in due time, if necessary, appropriate measures" in keeping with those a "fully informed private investor" would take, in other words, measures a "normal" rational investor would take in a market economy, in keeping with EU state aid rules.
Required Rate of Return: Return that the rational investor requires based on perceived risk of a particular investment.
Personal responsibility now requires the ability to be a disciplined, rational investor in difficult times, and many investors cannot do this.
Scott incorporates an information economics perspective as the theoretical underpinning to examine accounting theory, embracing rational investor decision making and the efficient market hypothesis as cornerstones for accounting decision making.
Economic logic dictates, and empirical evidence shows, that a rational investor would not pay premiums of the magnitude paid by Bavaria and Cisneros for a passive minority investment, but potentially would pay such premiums for an investment that provides control over the target company," the report states.
13) If a public corporation were financed half by stock and half by bonds, a rational investor holding the market portfolio would have his investment in that corporation divided evenly between its stock and its bonds.
713) dismiss this strategy on the grounds that the horizon of a rational investor is shorter than "the duration of noise traders' misperceptions.