growth rate

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Related to Rates of Growth: GDP Growth Rates

Growth Rate

The amount by which a variable increases over a given period of time as a percentage of its previous value. For example, a 3% growth rate in GDP for a year means that the value of an economy is 103% of the value of the previous year.

growth rate

The annual rate at which a variable, such as gross domestic product or a firm's earnings, has been or is expected to grow. One common method of estimating future growth rate is simply to measure a variable's past growth rate and then project a continuation of the trend.

Growth rate.

A growth rate measures the percentage increase in the value of a variety of markets, companies, or operations.

For example, a stock research firm typically tracks the rate at which a company's sales and earnings have grown as one of the factors in evaluating whether to recommend that investors purchase, hold, or sell its shares.

Similarly, the rate at which the gross domestic product grows is a measure of the strength of the US economy.

If you want to compare the vigor of entities or elements of different sizes, it's more accurate to look at growth rate than it is to look at the actual numerical change in value. For example, an emerging market might be growing at a much faster rate than a developed one even though the size of those economies is vastly different.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, the rates of growth in each of these economies eased compared to one month earlier.
Meanwhile, continuing the trend observed since April, activity in the services economy expanded at a rate above that of the manufacturing sector (although the differential between the implied rates of growth narrowed).
The recent UAW contract should enable Delphi to become more competitive, as it provides for moderately reduced rates of growth in the areas of wages and benefits (including a potential two-tier wage structure), while the number of UAW workers will continue to decline.
The 2002 Inc 500 reveals a surprising resiliency within the entrepreneurial sector, where leading companies are continuing to show dramatic rates of growth despite the recession.
Wireless access to the Internet has the potential to create a new surge of Internet growth, and future applications, which may require IP addresses even for home appliances, may also spur dramatic increases in rates of growth.
To match Amazon's current valuations, the volatility of expected rates of growth of revenues would have to increase by 182%.