Stoozing

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Stoozing

The practice in which the holder of multiple credit cards profits from taking advantage of differing interest rates and moving balances between cards.
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References in periodicals archive ?
SELF-STYLED rate tart Richard Mason, who has more than 20 interest- free cards on the go, reveals how to make money on them.
More adventurous customers - branded "rate tarts" by financial experts - jump from one card to another two or three times a year in search of the best offer.
Being a "rate tart" is a way of borrowing from Paul to pay Peter.
John Ryder is a rate tart and proud of it as he juggles his debts between; one credit card and another
I'm not a real rate tart, but I'm aware of the market and what's available.
CREDIT card "rate tart" Paul Glass may have a clever brain when it comes to making money - but his remarkable will power is his real strength.
The second way to get ahead in credit card terms is to become a "rate tart" and switch cards on a regular basis to take advantage of short-term deals.
S AYS Anna Bowes, at Chase de Vere: ``The message for savers from now on is: ` Be vigilant and be a rate tart. Make sure you are in a position to switch money from one account to another when figures move the wrong way.
It is the "rate tart" - someone who lenders describe as continually searching better deals and moving their mortgage - who is playing a major role in the high borrowing figures.
Other choice entries include tit tape (sticky stuff used to secure breasts in a revealing outfit) and rate tart (a person who moves money to take advantage of the best rates).
"These guys are rate tarts." "They're not very sophisticated." "They just want to get pissed and get laid." "They have the attention span of a gnat." "They're a captive audience." "They just want the facts."
co.uk said: "Credit card 'rate tarts' who will have previously moved on to the next introductory offer every few months may now be tempted to stay if they see real financial benefits from the rewards on offer."