Randomization


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Randomization

1. The selection of a representative, random section of the population. Randomization is important in generating accurate statistics, which is vital in marketing.

2. See: Random Number Generation.
References in periodicals archive ?
We had forgotten that the initial randomization would, by definition, surely give two similar groups of patients.
8) had an office visit within 3 months of randomization compared with 21.
12] suggests an in-place code randomization approach that probabilistically breaks 80 percent of the instruction sequences that are helpful for attacks.
Changes in cognition were similar across DPP arms, but a worse HbA1c level was associated with a worse cognition composite score in models adjusted for age at randomization and assessment year (P = .
This may have been influenced by the fact that more women in the placebo group received oxytocin before randomization.
Before we discuss the four methods, which make the SD-AIES Encryption Technique, we need to generate a number from the password, which will be used to randomize the file structure using the modified MSA Randomization module.
2) In his paper he evaluates the quality of the natural experiments in terms of the plausibility of the "as-if" randomization assumption.
A sample of 64 low-income rural women was randomly assigned to watch a video that explained randomization using one of three message strategies: (a) a low-literacy definition recommended by the National Cancer Institute: "Randomization is a method used to ensure the research study is fair.
Randomization means that some participants will receive the new therapy or treatment, while others will begin the current standard of care.
One reason often given for preferring cluster level randomization is a fear of "diffusion of treatment" (Raudenbush, 1997) or "contamination" (Donner and Klar, 2000).
The epidemiologic approach with the most promise in this regard is mendelian randomization (14-16), which is an instrumental variable approach to control for unobserved confounding factors in an observational setting.
Equally striking, most adjudicators now embrace randomization within their own institutions: they commonly use lotteries to assign incoming cases to each other.