Random-Number Generator

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Random-Number Generator

Any machine or activity that produces a series of numbers with no pattern. A random number generator may be simple, such as rolling dice or flipping a coin. Many others are complex computers. Random number generators are used in gambling, particularly in slots and lotteries.
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The moral objections to state-sponsored gambling were long ago swept away by courts and the apparently insatiable appetites of humans to wager on everything from horses and dogs to the whims of random-number generators and bouncing pingpong balls.
Large-scale studies, which rely on high-speed random-number generators and quicken the pace of volunteers' responses, seem to interfere with any psychokinetic effects, contends a group of psychokinesis researchers led by Dean Radin of the Institute of Noetic Sciences in Petaluma, Calif.
Using graph partitioning algorithms as an example, we demonstrate the often underestimated influence of these random-number generators on the result of the heuristic algorithms.
graph partitioning, heuristic algorithms, pseudo random-number generator
1) The truth of this notion depends, to a large extent, on the quality of the parallel random-number generators used.
In our selection of random-number generators to parameterize and include in SPRNG, we utilized extensive tests of randomness to empirically validate and refine our choices.
These random-number generators are the algorithms of choice for applications such as encrypting credit card numbers in Internet transactions, for which unpredictability is of paramount importance.
One of the first of these physical random-number generators, called Random.
However, the most widely used multiplicative, congruential random-number generators with modulus [2.
Faulty randomness Researchers provided new mathematical insight into why certain random-number generators give wrong results in some computational experiments and simulations (www.
Ferrenberg, a computational physicist at the University of Georgia in Athens, and his co-workers have discovered that even "high-quality" random-number generators, which pass a battery of randomness tests, can yield incorrect results under certain circumstances.
We've got a new situation in which conventional random-number generators just won't do," says George Marsaglia, a computer scientist and statistician at Florida State University in Tallahassee.
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