Random variable

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Random variable

A function that assigns a real number to each and every possible outcome of a random experiment.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Random Variable

In statistics, a variable expressing all possible outcomes of a set of circumstances. It is important in probability density function and probability distribution.
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References in periodicals archive ?
First, the use of robust measures of bias has reduced the effects of random variation and sample-specific interferences on the measurements of bias.
Most schools lie within the 95 per cent limits, thus any variation between them is hard to distinguish from random variation. Rankings of schools within these limits would therefore be dubious.
Banchuin, "Complete circuit level random variation models of nanoscale MOS performance," International Journal of Information and Electronics Engineering, vol.
The vorticity-stream function formulation of the 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with random variation in the viscosity and/or the boundary conditions is considered.
We demonstrated that the random intercept model gave inaccurate statistical inferences (bias and CIs) if there was between-set random variations in length effects.
It would therefore be difficult to differentiate the medication's effect from the random variation inherent in DXA scans.
Contrary to many assertions in the fall 2008 edition, evolution via natural selection and random variation is in fact scientific in that it has been observed and tested on the basis of evidence, not only in fossil records but even today in the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, resistance of insects to DDT, and, most currently, resistance of HIV to antiviral drugs.
Rosenberg theorizes that the actual DNA sequences responsible for particular developmental outcomes are "frozen accidents" of random variation and natural selection.
Forecast errors are caused by many factors, but the two main types are as follows: Bias Random variation Systematic variation Unsystematic caused by Caused by known forces unknown forces New or unanticipated Always present Unpredictable Range is predictable
This book's central thesis is that God uses random variation and natural selection (among other methods) to accomplish his purposes.
One of the first concepts that must be understood in measuring is the difference between random variation and determinate or systemic problems.
The dice-rolling and bead replacement models are subject to similar random variation. Of course, these topics can and should be covered in either the experimental procedure or during the laboratory briefing.