Random Access


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Random Access

In computer systems, the ability to access any point of a sequence in an equal amount of time. Random access contrasts with sequential access, in which different points in a sequence take varying amounts of time to access. Random access is also called direct access.
References in periodicals archive ?
- US Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) Market Share (in %) by Company: 2019 & 2025
A BR message with a BR preamble sequence and a quick message is newly adopted Random Access Channel (RACH) structure in IEEE 802.16m.
500MHz random access read operation: Intra-cell-signal amplification in a 5T2MTJ cell enables high speed read operation.
In the 2004 time frame, costs must be relative to anticipated dynamic random access memory (DRAM) at $500 per gigabyte and hard disks at $2 per gigabyte, and no greater than $50 per gigabyte to be competitive.
When the access control involves contention among nodes, the collision of packets transmitted by different nodes is possible; MAC schemes based on contention access require a random access scheduling method, such as a backoff algorithm, to schedule transmissions randomly in order to reduce the probability of collisions.
Adding capacity was a basic exercise of adding more central processing units, disk storage or random access memory, each of which had fairly predictable costs that could be allocated on a per user or per application basis and were often included in an information technology charge-back model.
The volatile memory market share will rise from 74% to nearly 78% in 2007, assuming that dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chips will continue to be the main memory element used for personal computers (PCs) and that new applications of flash memory will not keep pace with the overall growth in PC, workstation and network equipment memory requirements.
"With a single drive, they have high-capacity, removable storage; and a choice of rewritabiity with hard drive-like random access, or secure write-once media that can easily shared."
The world of random access memory, or RAM, is future oriented, with significant changes in the works.
The center also features a 24-tool dual swing arm ATC system and a bi-directional, random access tool magazine for optimum efficiency.
Designed for space and military applications, it will replace current memory and storage solutions such as flash memory, electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM), dynamic random access memory (DRAM), and hard disk drive devices.
Using tunneling magnetic junction random access memory (TMJ-RAM for short), IBM's Stuart Parkin is devising new memory chips that will be ultra-fast, will consume less power, and will retain stored data when a computer shuts down.